Morris

Semester Course Report - Under development

HIST 3032

 

Information for Course Description

 

Subject: HIST

Catalog Number: 3032

Effective Date: 2004-08-30 - Fall 2004                                Effective Status: A - Active

Course Title Abbr: Gender, Fam, Sex in Med Europe

Course Title Long: Gender, Family and Sexuality in Medieval Europe

 

Catalog Term Information: (for catalog production)

 

Units Minimum: 4.0                                                                         Grading Basis: OPT - Student Option

Units Maximum: 4.0                                                            Course Repeatable: N

Units Acad Prog: 4.0                                                             Total Units Allowed: 0.0

Units Finaid Prog: 4.0                                                          Total Completions Allowed: 0

Component1: SEM - Seminar                                               Final Exam1: Y

Catalog Description:

Examination of the ways that people in medieval Europe understood and experienced gender, family life, and sexuality. Attention to both theories and practices.

 

Semester Prerequisite:

 

Additional Course Information: (for catalog production)

 

Editor Comments: (for internal comments in departments, colleges, etc.)

Faculty sponsor: Anna Dronzek

 

Rationale: This course will give students the opportunity to learn about the historical roots of Western gender, family, and sexual attitudes and practices in medieval Europe. It will be structured as a seminar with emphasis on discussion and close reading of primary sources. Its subject matter is of great relevance to women's studies majors, and complements more modern discussion of these issues in other history courses, literature courses, sociology courses, and anthropology courses.

 

History Information: (for ongoing information, etc.)

Assessment/Goals: To teach students to recognize that attitudes and practices regarding gender, family, and sexuality are products of specific historical circumstances and to analyze the historical factors that influence such attitudes and practices. Students will also learn to analyze primary sources and evaluate historical arguments. Assessment of student progress will be based on brief response papers, quizzes, class participation, and a research paper.

 

Information for Morris General Education Requirements Curriculum

GER: HDIV


Morris

Semester Course Report - Under development

HIST 3359

 

Information for Course Description

Subject: HIST

Catalog Number: 3359

Effective Date: 2004-08-30 - Fall 2004                                Effective Status: A - Active

Course Title Abbr: Native Strategies for Survival

Course Title Long: Native Strategies for Survival 1880-1920

 

Catalog Term Information: (for catalog production)

Units Minimum: 4.0                                                                         Grading Basis: OPT - Student Option

Units Maximum: 4.0                                                            Course Repeatable: N

Units Acad Prog: 4.0                                                             Total Units Allowed: 0.0

Units Finaid Prog: 4.0                                                          Total Completions Allowed: 0

Component1: SEM - Seminar                                               Final Exam1: Y

Catalog Description:

This seminar explores the events and policies that sought to eliminate American Indian communities and cultures and the strategies that American Indians developed to survive. Students gain insight into a pivotal time for the "incorporation" of the U.S. and ongoing tensions between unity and diversity that characterize the nation's political economy and social structure. Paradoxes under scrutiny include the degree to which policies claiming to emancipate actually imprisoned and prisons became homelands.

 

Semester Prerequisite:

Additional Course Information: (for catalog production)

 

Editor Comments: (for internal comments in departments, colleges, etc.)

Faculty Sponsor: Wilbert Ahern

 

Rationale: This seminar explores the events and policies that sought to eliminate American Indian communities and cultures and the strategies that American Indians developed to survive. Students gain insight into a pivotal time for the "incorporation" of the U.S. and ongoing tensions between unity and diversity that characterize the nation's political economy and social structure. Paradoxes under scrutiny include the degree to which policies claiming to emancipate actually imprisoned and prisons became homelands. Students will read common primary and secondary historical sources and do in depth research on a specific reservation. The course subject and methodologies is directly applicable to history and American Indian Studies but is of relevance to studies in social sciences and literature.

 

History Information: (for ongoing information, etc.)

Assessment/Goals: Students will gain an understanding of the Euroamerican and some Native American cultures in the late 19th century and the role of material as well as cultural factors in shaping the interaction of the U.S. with native nations in a specific historical context. Students will also learn how to analyze primary sources and evaluate historical arguments. Assessment of student progress will be based on brief response papers, journals, discussion and a research paper.

 

Information for Morris General Education Requirements Curriculum

GER: HDIV


Morris

Semester Course Report - Under development

HIST 3462

Information for Course Description

Subject: HIST

Catalog Number: 3462

Effective Date: 2005-01-18 - Spring 2005                            Effective Status: A - Active

Course Title Abbr: A History of Rural America

Course Title Long: Strange Harvest: A History of Rural America

 

Catalog Term Information: (for catalog production)

Units Minimum: 4.0                                                                         Grading Basis: OPT - Student Option

Units Maximum: 4.0                                                            Course Repeatable: N

Units Acad Prog: 4.0                                                             Total Units Allowed: 0.0

Units Finaid Prog: 4.0                                                          Total Completions Allowed: 0

Component1: SEM - Seminar                                               Final Exam1: Y

Catalog Description:

The United States was, of course, born rural, and this central reality, despite urban growth and industrialization, has continued to inform American society and culture. This course through both primary and secondary sources traces the history of the rural United States from the beginning of European settlement to the present. Its primary focus is on the people themselves--farmers and townsfolk--and the impact of economic change on social and political life. Special attention is paid to the varied and complex response of different groups of rural Americans--immigrants, women, African Americans, to name a few--to changes within American agriculture. The course also pays close attention to how themes involving agriculture and rural life have played out in American culture. A research component is built into the course.

 

Semester Prerequisite:

Additional Course Information: (for catalog production)

 

Editor Comments: (for internal comments in departments, colleges, etc.)

Faculty Sponsor: Steve Gross  Rationale: Rural life is an important but neglected area in American history and its study raises profound questions about the larger American experience. Examining the evolution of class structure in the American countryside, the experience of immigrants and the status of rural women challenge long-held assumptions about the broader sweep of United States history. This class would also help students understand and relate to the larger west central Minnesota community. Finally, the primary research component of the class will involve work on the history of the West Central School of Agriculture and will help satisfy requirements of the Getty grant.

 

History Information: (for ongoing information, etc.)

Assessment: 1. Class discussion. 2. Series of short reaction papers based on reading and discussions. 3. A loner research paper based the campus manuscript collection and perhaps oral histories.

Goals: 1. Student will develop a fundamental understanding of the changing nature of rural life in the United States and especially the role of growing market involvement, increased engagement of the state and the advent of scientific farming. 2. Students will gain an understanding of the political and cultural response of rural people to these changes. 3. Students will gain an understanding of how these responses varied in time and across racial and ethnic boundaries. 4. Students will gain an understanding of the fundamental importance of family within rural settings, how the family traditionally functioned as the primary economic unit and the continued significance of women within the family economy. 5. Students will gain an understanding of the role of rural people within American culture and how the image of rural people has changed in time. 6. Students will explore how these themes have played out locally in the context of WCSA campus life.

 

Information for Morris General Education Requirements Curriculum

GER: HIST