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UMM Dean’s Office 315 Behmler Hall

 

 

UMM

Multiple Course Revisions

 

Rev: 07/2004

 
University of Minnesota, Morris

 

Multiple Course Revisions

 

 

 

USE FOR CATALOG YEAR CHANGES ONLY

This form is for presenting changes to Curriculum Committee; the information will still need to be entered in ECAS.

Sending this form to Curriculum Committee for Approval means Department and Discipline approval has been received.

 

Date:                September 27, 2006

Discipline:       Anthropology

Curriculum Committee Approval Date:

 

 

Course Revision #1

Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

 

ANTH 2301 3601s.  Social Change and Development in Latin America (IP; 4 cr; prereq-1111 or Soc 1101 or #)
Same as Soc 2301 3601. Study of types of social change taking place in Latin American countries, including economic, political, social, religious, and culture change. Problems faced, consequences of development, and other types of changes are placed in their social and cultural contexts.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

The course was originally designed and taught as a 3000 level course.  Unlike a broad survey course based on lecture and examinations more characteristic of 1000 and 2000 level courses, this course examines specific issues in depth and requires substantial written critique, as would be expected in a 3000 level course.  To maintain consistency, it should be returned to the level that reflects a comparable challenge of our other 3000 level courses.

 

Course Revision #2

Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

 

ANTH 2302 3602f.  Women in Latin America (IP; 4.0 cr; prereq-1111 or Soc 1101 or #)
Same as Soc 2302 3602. Study of social statuses of women in Latin American countries and the cultural norms influencing these statuses. Topics include class differences and the varied interests of women of different classes and ethnicities, women's movements, economic and political conditions, religion and women, etc.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

The course was originally designed and taught as a 3000 level course.  Unlike a broad survey course based on lecture and examinations more characteristic of 1000 and 2000 level courses, this course examines specific issues in depth and requires substantial written critique, as would be expected in a 3000 level course.  To maintain consistency, it should be returned to the level that reflects a comparable challenge of our other 3000 level courses.

 

 

Course Revision #3

Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

 

ANTH 2311.  CE: American Indian Assimilation and Resistance on the Great Plains Indians of the Great Plains:  Victims and Victors (HDIV; 4 cr)
Same as Engl 2311. Government efforts to "civilize" American Indians and Indians' resistance to these efforts. Course materials address indigenous opposition to the government's assimilating forces. Travel to important sites of American Indian resistance on the Great Plains.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Change course title.  New title more accurately reflects course material and focus.

 

Course Revision #4

Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

 

ANTH 2402 3402f.  Native American Indian Ethnography (HDIV;4 r; prereq-1111 or Soc 1101; not offered 2006-07  fall, even years)
An analysis of ethnographic and ethnohistoric materials focusing on specific Native American Indian cultures.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Change level (from 2402 to 3402). Unlike a broad survey course based on lecture and examinations more characteristic of 1000 and 2000 level courses, this course requires in-depth analytical critique of  specific issues and requires substantial written critique. 

Change course title and description.  New title and description use “American Indian” instead of “Native American” to be consistent with University usage and the proposed American Indian Studies major.

 

 

Course Revision #5

Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

 

ANTH 2451 3451f.  Contemporary Native Americans Indians (HDIV; 4 cr; prereq-1111 or Soc 1101 or #; not offered 2005-06 fall, odd years)
Same as Soc 2451 3451. The cultures, problems, and resurgence of contemporary Indian tribes in the U.S.  Native Americans in the 20th and 21st centuries. G Of interest are government policies; , gaming, urban populations, education, religion, self-determination, family, gaming, etc.  and identity.

 

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Change level (from 2451 to 3451).  Unlike a broad survey course based on lecture and examinations more characteristic of 1000 and 2000 level courses, this course requires in-depth analytical critique of  specific issues and requires substantial written critique. 

Change course title and description.  New title and description use “American Indian” instead of “Native American” to be consistent with University usage and the proposed American Indian Studies major.  New course description is more concise and accurate.

 

 

Course Revision #6

Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

 

ANTH 2452 3452s f.  Native American Indian Women (HDIV; 4 cr; prereq-1111 or Soc 1101 or #)
Same as Soc 2452 3452. The role of Indian and mixed-blood women in a variety of North American Indian cultures, both traditional and contemporary, using ethnography, autobiography, life history, biography, and fiction. The interaction of Indian women and their cultures with the colonizing cultures of Western Europe and the United States.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Change semester offered.  Change level (from 2452 to 3452).   Unlike a broad survey course based on lecture and examinations more characteristic of 1000 and 2000 level courses, this course requires in-depth analytical critique of  specific issues and requires substantial written critique. 

Change course title.  New title uses “American Indian” instead of “Native American” to be consistent with University usage and the proposed American Indian Studies major. 

 

 

Course Revision #7

Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

 

Anth 3201s.  Inequality Within and Among Nations Cases of Extreme Inequality (ENVT; 4 cr; 1111 or Soc 1101,one addl Anth or Soc course 2XXX or above, or #;spring, odd years)

Examines the effect of the interaction of human groups with their extant technologies and their physical, social, and cultural environments, focusing particularly on how this interaction affects social inequality, especially such extreme forms of contemporary social inequality as slavery and bonded labor, forced prostitution, infanticide due to poverty, and genocide.  The intra- and international effects on same.   The global hierarchy of nations.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

            Reactivate course.  Scheduling changes allow this course to be offered during the coming biennium.

Change title and course description to better reflect the content of the course.  Add additional prereq.

 

Course Revision #8

Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

 

ANTH 3203s.  Indigenous Peoples of the World: A Cultural Perspective (IP; 4 cr; prereq-1111 or Soc 1101 or #;not offered 2005-06 )
Same as Soc 3203. Examination of the cultures of indigenous peoples of the Americas, Asia, Africa, and Oceania. Particular attention is paid to processes of assimilation and acculturation, as well as contemporary efforts in identity formation.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Inactivate course.  Lack of teaching resources do not allow this course to be offered during the upcoming biennium.    

 

 

Course Revision #9

Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

 

ANTH 3302 - Variable Topics in Area Studies: American Indian Women (IP)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1111 or Soc 1101 or #)
Due to the emphasis placed on the role of the warrior in American Indian society, the role of women and their preception of the social changes that these societies have undergone over the last 500 years have been overlooked. This course will attempt to correct that oversight by listening to the voice of the women, mothers and wives in various texts and recorded interviews.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Inactivate course for purpose of ECAS cleanup.  Course did not appear in the 2005-07 Catalog, and has not been taught for several years.      

 

 

Course Revision #10

Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

 

ANTH 3411s f.  Seminar in Anthropological Methodology (E/CR; 4 cr; prereq-1111 or Soc 1101, 4 addtl cr in Anth or Soc)
Exploration and evaluation of methods used in cultural anthropology; qualitative methods in sociology and anthropology; research ethics; and design and execution of qualitative research project.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Change semester offered.  Change course description to reflect the execution of projects occurring in the new capstone course (Anth 4902).

 

Course Revision #11

Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

 

ANTH 3501s.  Critical Theory and Practice of Medical Anthropology (HDIV; 4 cr; prereq-2501 or #; not offered 2006-07; offered when feasible)
Analysis of the role of biomedicine as an increasingly dominant medical system in the world. The factors of race/ethnicity, gender, and social class in the ability to access, negotiate, and influence biomedical practice, beliefs, and research. 
Survey of the major theories of medical anthropology and the applications of this applied field.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Change title and course description.  Previous title and description too specific. 

INACTIVATE course.   Lack of teaching resources do not allow this course to be taught during the upcoming biennium.