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UMM Dean’s Office 315 Behmler Hall

 

 

UMM

Multiple Course Revisions

 

Rev: 07/2004

 
University of Minnesota, Morris

 

Multiple Course Revisions

 

 

 

USE FOR CATALOG YEAR CHANGES ONLY

This form is for presenting changes to Curriculum Committee; the information will still need to be entered in ECAS.

Sending this form to Curriculum Committee for Approval means Department and Discipline approval has been received.

 

Date:   September 20, 2006

Discipline:   History

Curriculum Committee Approval Date:

 

Course Revision #1

Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

 

HIST 1501f. Introduction to East Asian History: China, Japan, and Korea before 1650 1800. (IP; 4.0 cr)
Examination of the social, political, economic, technological, and cultural changes in East Asia before 1650 1800. Possible sub-themes include the rise of the Confucian world order, the spread of Buddhism, and East Asian interactions with the outside world. Discussion of changing perceptions of gender.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Change course title and course description.  Finish date being changed to 1800 because it is easier to end the histories of China, Japan, and Korea, as textbooks of East Asia tend to divide the modern and pre-modern periods at 1800.

 

Course Revision #2

Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

 

HIST 3008f,s. Islamic Thought and Culture, 500- 1000 CE The Making of the Islamic World, 500-1500  (HDIV; 4.0 cr; offered when feasible)
Examines the origins, spread and impact of Islamic civilization from the 6th through 15th centuries, with particular emphasis upon political, religious and intellectual developments.  many cultural achievements of early Islam, including contributions to astronomy, mathematics, and philosophy; a massive translation movement to preserve Greek texts; and the extension of broad political and intellectual liberties to people of various religious faiths. Special attention paid to Muslim-controlled Spain, which became a medieval cultural center, drawing Christian scholars from throughout Europe.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Change course title and course description.  Previous description and title was too specific and omitted key chronological and topical coverage.

 

Course Revision #3

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HIST 3101f,s.  Renaissance and Reformation (HIST; 4.0 cr; offered when feasible)

Italian and Northern Renaissances as cultural, economic, and political phenomena; the Reformation as a religious and political movement.  Examination of western European history and historiography between 1350 and 1600 with emphasis on cultural “renaissances,” and religious “reformations.”

 


Rationale (see instructions):

Change course description.  Previous description inaccurate and not reflective of importance of historiography in this topic.

 

Course Revision #4

Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

 

HIST 3156f,s.  Modern German Intellectual History (HIST; 4.0 cr; offered when feasible)

Examination of German intellectual history from 19th and 20th century philosophical, literary, and scientific sources. Reading of translated excerpts from Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Kafka, Rosa Luxemburg, Clara Zetkin, Einstein, Neils Bohr, and others. Consideration of Nazi propaganda and the use of science and pseudoscience by the Third Reich

Many of the most influential ideas of the 19th and 20th century emerged from the German-speaking world, and it is worth considering how and why that happened.  This course examines German intellectual history since 1815 and the various relationships between ideas and politics that have shaped German state-building, as well as the ways in which those ideas have had other lives in other places.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Change course description because the previous description is confining in terms of texts.  The instructor would like to choose her own texts.

 

Course Revision #5

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HIST 3207f,s. The Crusades (HIST IP; 4.0 cr; offered when feasible)

The European crusades from 1000-1500, with emphasis on diverse responses particularly, by both Muslims and Christians.   Explores the historical contexts and consequences of the European Crusades between the 11th and 13th centuries, including the perspective of European Jews, Turkish and Arabic Muslims, and Byzantine and Near Eastern Christians.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Change GER (from HIST to IP), and change course description.  Previous description was grammatically incorrect.and did not elaborate enough on the diversity of perspectives (now is an IP course).

 

Jennifer Deane would like to see this course designated as IP because it was specifically designed to provide students with a comparative international perspective on the series of events known as “the Crusades”. We read Muslim, Jewish, Greek Christian and western Christian primary sources; study the geography of Greece, the Mediterranean, the Levant (modern day Turkey, Syria, Israel etc.) and northern Africa; and examine how historical interpretations shift according to one’s geographical and cultural point of view. In terms of specific tasks, students read excerpts from the Qur’an and Hebrew Bible as well as the New Testament, learn about Islamic theology (including internal splits and dissent) in addition to Christian doctrine, and study Byzantine, Mamluk and Ottoman states as well as western European.

 

 

Course Revision #6

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HIST 3551f. Modern Japan (IP HIST; 4.0 cr)

The history of Japan from the foundation of the Tokugawa Shogunate until the present. Special attention to issues of gender, nationalism, and modernity.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Change GER (from IP to HIST) and change year not offered.  HIST category will better reflect the single-nation focus of the course. With a change in course instructors, there has been a marked change in curriculum content. It is therefore felt that a “Historical Perspectives” designation is a more accurate reflection of actual course goals. Specifically, the course will concern itself more with changes and continuities in Japanese history over time. The course’s previous emphasis on placing Japanese history in an international, comparative context has been downplayed. HIST 3551 will focus exclusively on one nation, Japan.

 

Course Revision #7

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HIST 3552s. History of Modern China (IP HIST; 4.0 cr; offered when feasible)
Study of the history of China from the foundation of the Qing dynasty in the 1600s until the present. Special attention to issues of gender, nationalism, and modernity.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Change GER (from IP to HIST) to better reflect the single-nation focus of the course.  Insert “Modern” in course title to better reflect the time period covered by course.  This course will begin with 1600 CE, and not cover all of the history of Chinese Civilization. With a change in course instructors, there has been a marked change in curriculum content. It is therefore felt that a “Historical Perspectives” designation is a more accurate reflection of actual course goals. Specifically, the course will concern itself more with changes and continuities in Chinese history over time. The course’s previous emphasis on placing Chinese history in an international, comparative context has been downplayed. HIST 3552 will focus exclusively on one nation, China.

 

Course Revision #8

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HIST 3704f,s. Women in the Middle Ages (SS; 4.0 cr; prereq-1101 or 1102 or 1301, WoSt 1101; offered when feasible)
Examination of lives of women in Europe from about 500 to 1500.  Analysis of the history of European women, and gender systems as constructed during the Middle Ages (c. 500-1500).

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Remove prerequisites and change course description.  Previous description didn't draw enough attention to gender as a category of analysis.

 

Course Revision #9

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1.         HIST 3003f,s. World War I (HIST;4.0 cr)
2.         HIST 3007f,s. The Invention of the University in Medieval Europe
(HIST; 4.0 cr)

3.         HIST 3152f,s. Modern Middle East from Imperialism to Independence, 1876-1948 (HIST; 4.0 cr)

4.         HIST 3154f,s. The Scientific Revolution (HIST; 4.0 cr)

5.         HIST 3155f,s. Science, Technology, and Warfare in the 20th Century (HIST; 4.0 cr)

6.         HIST 3157f,s. Modern Russian Intellectual History (HIST; 4.0 cr)

7.         HIST 3158f,s. Women in Science, 1650-1950 (HIST; 4.0 cr)

8.         HIST 3208s.f. Modern Britain (HIST; 4.0 cr)

9.         HIST 3606f.  Ancient Maya Civilization (HIST; 4.0 cr)

10.       HIST 3701f,s. Women and Religion: A History (SS; 4.0 cr; Prereq-1101 or 1102 or 1301, WoSt 1101)

.                       11.       HIST 3702f,s. The History of Women in the West (HDIV; 4.0 cr; Prereq-1101 or 1102 or 1301, WoSt 1101)

12.        HIST 3703f,s.  20th-Century European Women (HIST;   4.0 cr; Prereq-1101 or 1102 or 1301, WoSt 1101)

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Inactivate 12 History courses.  Given the current makeup of faculty in the History discipline, these courses will not be offered during the next biennium.

 

Course Revision #10

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HIST 1502s. Introduction to East Asia, 1600-2000 (IP; 4.0 cr)

Introduction to the societies, cultures, and historical changes in East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam) since 1600. The impact that foreign (European and American powers) political, economic, and cultural intrusions had on East Asian governments, the elites, and the common people. How the governments and elites dominated the modernization discourses and disciplined the people in the name of modernity, nationalism, and anti-imperialism. The responses of the subordinated groups (working class, peasants, the colonized, women, the ethnic minorities, and the youth), either internalizing or rejecting the dominant ideologies. Class time is devoted mostly to lectures but also includes time for questions, discussions, and films.

 

Rationale (see instructions):

Inactivate course as an ECAS cleanup measure.  Course was taught by a temporary Instructor, and has never been listed in the Catalog.