UMM ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

COURSE PROPOSALS

Form RC:

Revised Course Proposal

FORM RC

(2/00)

Discipline:

Philosophy

 

 

Date:

9/20/00

 

Course Revision #1

I. Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

Phil 1101. Introduction to Philosophy. (Hum; 4 cr; offered fall 1999, spring 2001)

An introduction to fundamental problems in philosophy, philosophical problems, in areas such as metaphysics (what exists?), epistemology (what can we know? and how can we know it?), and ethics (what actions are moral and immoral? and what is the good life?), The course will emphasize the development of basic with an emphasis on developing the reading, writing, and analytical skills required for philosophical investigation.

II. Rationale (see instructions):

Expand the description so that students will have a better idea of what some of the fundamental problems of philosophy are.

Course Revision #2

I. Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

Phil 1111. Philosophical Skills. (Hum; 4 cr; not offered 2000-2001)

Philosophical Skills, or "How to win an argument," is a course in philosophical reasoning and argumentation. Its primary goal is to help with the development of analytical skills for philosophical inquiry. Emphasis on modal properties such as impossibility and necessity; modal relations like implication and inconsistency; arguments (e.g., is time travel possible? or do we have freedom to do otherwise?) which "turn on" modal properties, relations, or principles; and such philosophical pitfalls as question-begging and circularity. Skills is a course in reasoning. Its aim is to help with the development of analytical skills for philosophical inquiry. Emphasis on modal properties such as impossibility and necessity; modal relations like implication and consistency; and philosophical fallacies such as question-begging and circularity.

 

II. Rationale (see instructions):

Revised to meet the 350 characters limit.

Course Revision #3

I. Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

Phil 1121f. Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. (HDiv; 4 cr; offered fall 2001)

An introduction to fundamental philosophical questions concerning religion, such as the notion of divinity, the possibility of proving the existence of a divinity, the relationship between faith and reason, etc., and the significance of mysticism. Views belonging to distant distinct religious traditions as well as to different gender, racial, and social perspectives will be discussed.

 

II. Rationale (see instructions):

Revised to meet the 350 characters limit.

Course Revision #4

I. Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

Phil 2101f. Introduction to Symbolic Logic. (M/SR; 4 cr)

An introduction to formal or deductive logic, this course will cover 1) basic concepts of logical argumentation, 2) Aristotelian logic, 3) symbolic translations, truth tables, and theory of deduction. The final part of the course focuses on applications of the symbolic language and formal tools to philosophically interesting puzzles and paradoxes. During the course, samples from political speeches, philosophical essays as well as original LSAT questions are analyzed.

II. Rationale (see instructions):

Revised to meet the 350 characters limit.

 

 

Course Revision #5

I. Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

Phil 2111. Introductory Ethics. (Hum; 4 cr; not offered 1999-2000)

This course has two major aims: 1) to examine critically normative ethical theories, like utilitarianism or social contract theory, as responses to the age-old problem of what makes right acts right and wrong acts wrong; 2) to explore "real life" moral problems, debates, and arguments in light of the methods and/or standards of moral assessment employed by ethical theorists. This introductory-level course examines philosophical accounts of what makes right acts right and wrong acts wrong; issues involving the concept of goodness; and arguments or debates about moral responsibility.

II. Rationale (see instructions):

Revised to meet the 350 characters limit.

Course Revision #6

I. Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

Phil 2112s. Professional Ethics. (E/CR; 4 cr; not offered fall 2000)

A critical examination of moral issues that arise in our professions. Possible topics include normative ethical theories (theories about what makes right acts right and wrong acts wrong); affirmative action and preferential hiring; duties to one’s employer; autonomy in the workplace; ethical issues in advertising; corporate responsibility; sexual harassment; coercive wage offers; distributive justice; and sexual harassment. and plea bargains; responsibility for the environment.

 

II. Rationale (see instructions):

Revised to meet the 350 characters limit.

Course Revision #7

I. Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

Phil 2131s. Introduction to the Philosophy of Science. (HDiv; 4 cr; offered spring 2001)

An introduction to modern philosophical discussion concerning the nature of science. The first part of the course focuses on Topics cover the basic concepts and logic of scientific inquiry, . The second part discusses topics such as the aims and values of scientific inquiry, the relationship between scientific progress and truth, and the social and cultural make-up of scientific communities. Readings will include feminist views on science.

 

II. Rationale (see instructions):

Revised to meet the 350 characters limit.

Course Revision #8

I. Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

Phil 3121. Political Philosophy. (SS; 4 cr; QP-1201 or 1213 or 1215 of #; SP-any 1xxx or 2xxx course except 2101.)

Explores fundamental issues in political theory (e.g., the nature of the state, political authority, distributive justice, natural and civil rights) using important works of major political theorists (like Plato, Hobbes, Mill, Rawls).

The course explores fundamental issues in political philosophy (e.g. political authority; distributive justice; the nature, origin, and justification of the state; natural and civil rights) by, among other things, an examination of the works of philosophers like Plato, Hobbes, Mill, and Rawls.

II. Rationale (see instructions):

Revised to meet the 350 characters limit.

 

 

Course Revision #9

I. Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

Phil. 3131. Philosophy of Law. (SS; 4 cr; QP-1201 or 1213 or 1215 of #; SP-any 1xxx or 2xxx course except 2101.)

Introduction to and critical examination of important theoretical and practical normative issues in the philosophy of law, some examples of which are the nature of law; the relationship between morality and the law; the nature of judicial reasoning; the justification of punishment; plea bargaining; legal responsibility; civil disobedience.

A critical examination of theoretical and practical normative issues in the philosophy of law, some examples of which are the nature of law, the justification of punishment; plea bargaining; legal and moral responsibility; and civil disobedience.

II. Rationale (see instructions):

Revised to meet the 350 characters limit.

Course Revision #10

I. Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

Phil 3151s. The Classical World. History of Ancient Philosophy. (Hist; 4 cr; QP–1201 or 1213 or 1215 or #; SP– prereq. any 1xxx or 2xxx course except Phil 2101 Introduction to Symbolic Logic not offered 2000-2001)

Aim: exploration of the major philosophical views of the pre- socratic thinkers, Plato, and Aristotle. The course will also address the decline of the Greek tradition.

An exploration of the views of philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, and the Stoics. Possible topics include ancient views on the nature of and possibility of knowledge, the relationship of the soul to the body, and what the good life is for a human being.

II. Rationale (see instructions):

Change the course name and description in order to reflect more accurately the course content.

Course Revision #11

I. Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

Phil 3161s. The Medieval World and the Renaissance. History of Medieval Philosophy (Hist; 4 cr; QP–1201 or 1213 or 1215 or #; SP– prereq any 1xxx or 2xxx course except Phil 2101 Introduction to Symbolic Logic not offered 2000-2001)

Aim: exploration of the major philosophical views of authors such as St. Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Scotus, Ockham, Suarez, Copernicus, and Galileo.

An exploration of the views of philosophers such as Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Bonaventure, Aquinas, and Ockham. Possible topics include the relationship between faith and reason, the problem of God's foreknowledge and human freedom, and proofs for God's existence.

II. Rationale (see instructions):

Change the course name and description in order to reflect more accurately the course content.

Course Revision #12

I. Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

Phil 3171f. The Modern World. History of Modern Philosophy. (Hist; 4 cr; QP–1201 or 1213 or 1215 or #; SP– prereq any 1xxx or 2xxx course except Phil 2101 Introduction to Symbolic Logic )

Aim: exploration of major philosophical views ranging from Hobbes' work to Kant's, Wittgenstein's, and Sartre's.

An exploration of the views of philosophers such as Descartes, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Possible topics include the relationship of the mind to the body, and whether and how it is possible to have knowledge of the external world.

II. Rationale (see instructions):

Change the course name and description in order to reflect more accurately the course content.

Course Revision #13

I. Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

Phil 4100. Variable Topics in Moral Issues and Theories. (Hum; 4 cr; repeatable when topic changes; QP-1201 or 1213 or 1215 of #; SP-any 1xxx or 2xxx course except 2101.)

This "special topics" course involves intensive investigation of a particular problem, area, or theory in moral philosophy. Possible topics include moral responsibility, autonomy, punishment, and moral issues in philosophical psychology (e.g., is weakness of will possible, and if so, are we doing wrong when we act akratically or are we blameworthy for our akratic actions?). Topics announced in advance and will vary from course offering to course offering.

Intensive investigation of a particular problem, area, issue, or theory in moral philosophy. Possible topics include moral responsibility, autonomy, weakness of will, and self-deception. Topics will vary across course offerings.

II. Rationale (see instructions):

Revised to meet the 350 characters limit.

Course Revision #14

I. Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

Phil 4111. Ethical Theory. (Hum; 4 cr; QP-1201 or 1213 or 1215 of #; SP-any 1xxx or 2xxx course except 2101.)

The primary purpose of this course is to engage in philosophical deliberation on metaethical concerns. A sample of central issues to be explored are these: Can moral obligations change over the passage of time? Does ‘ought’ imply ‘can’? Is there a real distinction between "subjective moral obligation" and "objective moral obligation"? Is it possible for there to be an individual and time, such that relative to that time, the individual has two moral obligations that cannot be jointly fulfilled? Of the different sorts of normative obligations like legal, prudential, and moral, is moral obligation overriding?

This course in metaethics focuses on the nature of moral obligation. Topics to be discussed include: Can moral obligations change with the passage of time? Are genuine moral dilemmas possible? Does ‘ought’ imply ‘can’? Is moral obligation overriding? Is there a genuine distinction between "subjective" and "objective" moral obligation?

II. Rationale (see instructions):

Revised to meet the 350 characters limit.

Course Revision #15

I. Give complete UMM catalog entry (deletions in strikethru font, additions underlined)(see instructions)

Phil 4901fs. Senior Philosophical Defense. (1 cr)

Oral presentation and discussion of a paper selected among those written by the student for a 3xxx or 4xxx course. Faculty will participate in the discussion.

Writing and defending a senior philosophical thesis is the culminating experience for UMM philosophy majors. In this course, majors develop a piece of their philosophical writing, producing multiple drafts in response to comments from a variety of philosophical viewpoints, and then orally defend their thesis.

II. Rationale (see instructions):

Expand the course description in order to make clear that part of the course involves making multiple revisions of one’s writing before the oral defense.

Regular Approval Process:

Forms RC must go through the following regular approval process (put check in box and date when approved):

 

Date

Step #

IH

9/20/00

1)

Discipline approves (sends hard copy and electronic copy of proposal to #2)

JN

9/27/00

2)

Division approves (Division Chair sends proposal to #3)

 

 

3)

Curriculum Committee approves (sends proposal to #4)

 

 

4)

Campus Assembly approves. (Course revisions become effective immediately following Campus Assembly approval, unless specifically requested otherwise in the Rationales.)

Provisional Approval Process:

If time does not allow for the regular approval procedures to be completed before the course is to be taught, or if a course will be taught only once, "provisional approval" can be secured for a one-time offering of the course. For provisional approval, curricular change forms must go through the following process (put check in box and date when approved):

 

Date

Step #

 

 

1)

Discipline approves (sends hard copy and electronic copy of proposal to #2)

 

 

2)

Division Chair, approving for one-time offering, sends proposal to #3

 

 

3)

Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, with concurrence of the Division Chairs, approves the course for a one-time offering