Assessment of Student Learning



Philosophy Discipline


UNIT MISSION/GOAL(S)

The philosophy program is designed to offer students the opportunity to study systematically the works of significant figures in philosophy; investigate the fundamental problems and systems of thought that frame philosophical inquiry; develop the ability to think and write critically and effectively; and cultivate the logical, analytical, and conversational skills necessary for stimulating and fruitful philosophical inquiry.

Unit Mission/goal(s) and the Institutional Mission Relation

The philosophy program serves as an integral part of students' active pursuit of a broad liberal arts education; philosophy, after all, has and will continue to be, a subject central to a well-rounded education. Apart from fostering writing, logical, analytical, and conversational skills necessary for fruitful inquiry across disciplines, the program exposes students to a broad spectrum of problems, issues, and ideas that people from different cultures and epochs have wrestled with or pondered.


STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES, EXPECTED OUTCOMES, ASSESSMENT METHODS & TOOLS, TIMELINE

Learning Objective 1
Good writing.
Expected Outcome 1

A. A well structured paper (a clear introduction, discussion of the main issue, and conclusion).

B. Correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

C. A good fluid style.

Method(s), Measure(s), and Instrument(s) for Expected Outcome 1
Reading papers, grading papers, and discussion of written work with the student, with particular attention (not to content) but to structure, grammar, spelling, punctuation, accessibility, and style.
Timeline for the Outcome 1
Starting Date for the Implementation: In Progress
Anticipated Date for the First Results: In Progress

Learning Objective 2
Understanding of the theory, argument, principle, or (more generally) issues in question.
Expected Outcome 2

A. Grasp of the material

B. Being able to summarize (correctly) in one's own terms, the material in question.

C. Being able to ask and respond to pertinent questions.

Method(s), Measure(s), and Instrument(s) for Expected Outcome 2

A. Exams, quizzes, and papers.

B. Discussion of the material with the faculty and class.

C. Oral presentation of the material.

Particular emphasis here on whether the student shows comprehension of the material.

Timeline for the Outcome 2
Starting Date for the Implementation: In Progress
Anticipated Date for the First Results: In Progress

Learning Objective 3
Critical assessment of the issue in question, and positive contributions.
Expected Outcome 3

A. Ability to evaluate the issue.

B. Ability to take a stance: to support or argue against a principle, thesis, position, etc.

C. Ability to trace pertinent implications of the thesis, principle, position, etc., and to draw connections among the latter and other material introduced in other classes.

D. Ability to introduce novel considerations or arguments that bear on the issue under discussion.

Method(s), Measure(s), and Instrument(s) for Expected Outcome 3
Assessing assignments, class discussion, and oral presentations with particular attention to:

A. Argument strategy

B. Validity and soundness of the argument

C. New ideas or thoughts.

Timeline for the Outcome 3
Starting Date for the Implementation: In Progress
Anticipated Date for the First Results: In Progress
Learning Objective 4
Effective oral communication.
Expected Outcome 4

A. Ability to give clear oral presentations or summaries of issues, principles, theses, etc.

B. Ability to formulate clearly relevant questions

C. Ability to respond clearly to questions.

Method(s), Measure(s), and Instrument(s) for Expected Outcome 4

A. Senior thesis or oral defense

B. Oral presentations of papers at professional meeting or conferences, or to the class.

C. Leading class discussion.

D. One-to-one oral exchanges between professor and student.

Timeline for the Outcome 4
Starting Date for the Implementation: In Progress
Anticipated Date for the First Results: In Progress