Assessment of Student Learning



Psychology Discipline

SPRING, 2003

Phase I.

Unit Mission/Goal(s)

Please state your unit’s mission/goal(s):

To foster understanding of and the ability to apply the scientific method to the problems of the behavioral sciences and of individual and social human behavior by providing students with basic methods, logical skills and practice in applying them and by providing an introduction to core area of psychology

Please describe how your unit mission/goal(s) relate to the institutional mission

It is an integral part of the institutional mission.

 

Student Learning Objectives/Expected Outcomes

Learning Objective 1.

Awareness of the range of knowledge (data methods) in psychology

Expected Outcome 1.

Successful completion of the required range of upper division psychology courses

Learning Objective 2.

Competency in translating behavioral questions into the terms of scientific inquiry in psychology

Expected Outcome 2.

Be able to formulate a research problem in psychology

Learning Objective 3.

Competency in reading and critically synthesizing the technical literature in psychology

Expected Outcome 3.

Be able to prepare reviews of literature in specialized subject areas of psychology

Learning Objective 4.

Competency in quantifying and statistically analyzing behavior

Expected Outcome 4.

Be able to carry out measurement and data analysis in a research project

Learning Objective 5.

Awareness of ethical issues in psychology

 

 

 

 

Expected Outcome 5.

Know ethical and legal constraints on psychological practice and research

Assessment Methods & Tools

Method(s), Measure(s), and Instrument(s) for Expected Outcome 1.

1. Examinations whose questions draw on or are patterned after nationally used question banks

2. Satisfactory preparation for next-level courses

3. Scores on GRE Psychology subject test

Outcome 1

Starting Date for the Implementation:

In Progress

Anticipated Date for the First Results:

In Progress

Method(s), Measure(s), and Instrument(s) for Expected Outcome 2.

Successful conceptualization of a research project (approved empirical project requirement of major) in an Empirical Investigations course, UROP, MAP, or Research Apprenticeship project..

Outcome 2

Starting Date for the Implementation:

In Progress

Anticipated Date for the First Results:

in Progress

 

Method(s), Measure(s), and Instrument(s) for Expected Outcome 3.

Completion of an acceptable review of literature in an Empirical Investigations course (or UROP, MAP, or Research Apprenticeship project)

Outcome 3

Starting Date for the Implementation:

In Progress

Anticipated Date for the First Results:

In Progress

Method(s), Measure(s), and Instrument(s) for Expected Outcome 4.

1. Successful completion of Math 1601 or 2601

2. Successful completion of statistical analyses in an approved project in an Empirical Investigations course or in an UROP, MAP, or Research Apprenticeship project

Outcome 4

Starting Date for the Implementation:

In Progress

Anticipated Date for the First Results:

In Progress

Method(s), Measure(s), and Instrument(s) for Expected

Outcome 5.

Presentation of a paper and other written responses demonstrating satisfactory knowledge of how ethical principles and legal constraints will impact the student’s functioning in a postbaccalaureate human-services-related professional position; completion of a successful application to the Institutional Review Board (IRB) or the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) for undertaking an empirical investigation, which requires functional knowledge of ethical and legal obligations for conducting research

Outcome 5

Starting Date for the Implementation:

In Progress

Anticipated Date for the First Results:

In Progress

Phase II.

Use of Observed Outcomes and Possible Actions

Please comment on the possible use of the findings of your assessment plan.

In responding to this question you may want to consider the following issues: How would the results of the assessment be communicated to faculty in your own and other disciplines? How could the results be used to improve the student learning and programs? How could the results produce input to other related processes (e.g., academic and nonacademic planning, curriculum review)? How could the results of the assessment change your unit’s mission/goal(s)? With which other units would you like to share the results of your assessment?

The Psychology Discipline will undertake an annual review of the results of the assessment procedures and consider the desirability of making changes in curriculum or teaching methods.

Because the approved project is an important part of the student’s competency assessment, projects will henceforth be submitted in electronic form and stored for periodic review by the Psychology Discipline Faculty and potentially by outside reviewers and site visitors, such as NCA teams.

The Psychology Discipline Faculty are also still engaged in deliberations about what form a more comprehensive student portfolio might take, which would contain all of the student’s written assessment materials.

 

The Implementation Needs

Please comment on the information and assistance necessary for the successful implementation of your assessment process.

In responding to this question you may want to consider issues such as: What are the other units (e.g., other disciplines, programs, administrators and/or committees) that should produce input for the successful completion of your assessment cycle? What type of input do you need from other units? What should be the function of the Assessment of Student Learning Committee and Coordinator to increase the effectiveness of your unit’s assessment process? What type of support might your unit need for the planning and application of your assessment cycle?

We are already terribly short of storage space. As records of assessment accumulate, we will need to find a central storage locale. Because UMM disciplines have no separate offices, and because discipline coordinators receive no special amenities, storage in discipline coordinators’ offices may be difficult or even impossible. It would be helpful to have an assessment materials storage place for the campus or perhaps for each division.

ASL’s record-keeping requests, especially those in the appendix to this questionnaire, go well beyond reasonable burdens on the individual faculty (including coordinators) who people our disciplines. If ASL wants this level of information, it will have to arrange for designated staff time to obtain it. The effort will need to begin well before the information is needed, because we are dealing here with cumulative information that needs to be obtained year to year.

 

 

 

Phase III.

Application: Observed Outcomes

Please comment on your findings of the implementation of the assessment methods and tools.

In responding to this question you may want to summarize your findings, provide data that supports your interpretations, discuss the validity of your results, and suggest ways of improving the methods and tools that you have used.

We have no formal "findings" at this time. An approved project by two psychology majors won the "Best Undergraduate Paper Award" of the Minnesota Academy of Sciences 1999 meeting. The premier Journal of Personality and Social Psychology published the report of an approved project by three psychology majors completed a few years previously. That may be an indication of project quality within the discipline.

 

Actions Taken

Please comment on the actions that you have taken or are planning to take based on your findings.

In responding to this question you may want to consider the following issues; What other units were involved with the actions that you have taken? What was the impact of the actions that you have taken on the students’ learning? What other structures do you propose to increase the success of your actions?

We have just reorganized the curriculum for semesters. Decisions were taken in light of previous results with the quarter curriculum. It is too early to comment on the semester curriculum.

 

Appendices

You may want to provide the following optional information that may be relevant to your unit’s assessment of student learning plan.

Number of degrees granted within the past 5 (or more) years

Major

Minor

Area of Concentration

Emphasis

Teacher Education

161

Please list the graduates of your program who are (were) in the graduate programs and provide approximate acceptance rate for your graduates.

Troy Seppelt, Western Michigan University (Counseling)

Eric Goetzman, U. of Alabama, Birmingham (Genetics)

Tanya A. Peterson, U. of Iowa (Physical Therapy)

D.F. Leppink, Law School someplace!

Karin Smalkoski, ESL master's level program at TC Campus

Kim Legro, Mater's program in psych at Northern Iowa

Faith Middleton, MSW at Fargo

 

 

 

Please list the post graduate activity of your students and provide approximate percentages for each group.

Sarah Sorenson - U of Minnesota (masters prog)

Mark Wagner - U of Minnesota (masters prog)

Eric Brandt - law school

Kelli Donald - Medical College of Toledo - occupational therapy - (masters)

Kris Karl - U of Minnesota (Ph.D. program)

Joline Ness- Duquesne Univ - Masters of Science program

Rebecca Stolt - U of Nothern Michigan (I think) - residential advisor and counselor masters program

Karie Gibson - U of Minnesota (Ph.D. program)

Tammi Sippel - Mankato State - masters program

Jennifer Sewall - masters program in speech pathology - LaCross, I think.

Carolin Merkle - Mayo in a joint MD/Ph.D program

Kay Schulz (interview now at Michigan State)

Erin Costanzo (interviews now and accepted at at least one school)

Karen Graupman got into the Ph.D. program in political psychology last year but put it off for a year (U of MN)

Kelly Murphy got into some kind of IO or organizational or human services program. She worked with Jenny

Dose.

 

 

 

Please list student publications in your program that took place within the past 5 (or more) years?

Book chapter:

Sisk, C.L. and Meek, L. R. (1997). Sexual and Reproductive Behaviors. In: Current Protocols in Neuroscience, Eds. Crawley, Gerfen, et al., Wiley and Sons: New York.

Articles:

Meek, L.R., Romeo, R.G., Novak, C.G. and Sisk, C.L. (1997). Actions of testosterone in prepubertal and postpubertal male hamsters: Dissociation of effects on reproductive behavior and brain androgen receptor

immunoreactivity. Hormones and Behavior, 31, 75-88.

Meek, L. R., Burda, K.M. and Paster, E. (accepted). Effects of Prenatal Stress on Development in Mice I: Maturation and Learning. Physiology and Behavior

Meek, L.R. and Schulz, K.M. (accepted). Effects of prenatal stress on development in mice II: Sexual orientation in males. Physiology and Behavior.

Meek, L.R., Dittel, P.L., Sheehan, M.C., Chan, J. and Kjolhaug, S.R. (accepted). Effects of stress during pregnancy on maternal behavior in mice. Physiology and Behavior

Journal Publications that have included UMM student researchers:

Ratliff-Crain, J., Donald, K.*, & Ness, J.* (1999). The relative impact of knowledge, beliefs, peer norms, and past behaviors on current risky sexual behaviors among college students. Psychology and Health,14, 625-641.

Ratliff-Crain, J., & Kane, J.* (1995). Predictors for altering caffeine consumption during stress. Addictive Behaviors, 20, 509-516.

Other publications

Ratliff-Crain, J., Aamot, J.*, Fehlen, P.*, & Holt, C.* (1994). Evaluation of the Morris Area Community Education's Partners In Sync program. In M.B. Neal, R. Shumar, & K. Gorak (Eds.), Evaluation: The key to improving service learning programs. St. Paul, MN: National Service Learning Cooperative: K - 12 Clearing House on Service Learning, the Department of Vocational Education, University of Minnesota.

 

 

 

Conference Papers and Presentations (UMM students denoted with "*")

College students' use of traditional dating scripts (with Larson, S.* & Berman, K.*). Eastern Psychological Association Annual Convention, Providence, RI, 1999.

The effects of test anxiety on explicit and implicit recall (with Allen, K.* & Schneider, N.*). Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL, 1997.

Gender differences in responses to the initiation of sexual behaviors within a computer-simulated first date (with Griggs, A.* & Wrabek, A.*). Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL, 1996.

Use of undergraduates as laboratory/discussion leaders in introductory psychology courses (with Whitehill, E.*). Round-table discussion. Presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Society, Washington, DC, 1994.

Predictors for altering caffeine consumption when under stress (with Kane, J.*). Presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Society, Washington, DC, 1994.

Gender differences in the evaluation of female characters in music videos (with Johnson, K.* and Osterkamp, K.*). Presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Society, Washington, DC, 1994.

Alcohol as a factor in risky sexual decision-making (with Doucette, E.*, Thibedeau, J.*, Thorsteinson, T.*, & Wandersee, D.*). Symposium presentation at the Eastern Psychological Association Annual Convention, Providence, RI, 1994.

 

 

Please list student projects in your program that have been implemented within the past 5 (or more) years, such as UROP, MAP, etc.

UROPS

Donald Beissel (1990)

Lisa Westgard (1991)

Helen Flodstrom (1991)

Doug Wandersee (1992)

Jolene Thibedeau (1992)

Erin Costanzo (1999)

Sarah Kjolhaug (1999)

 

 

Angela Heruth

Nicole E. LaPointe

Kalynn M. Schulz

1996: Eric Crabtree - Growth, Identification and Functional Testing of Natural Birth Control Seeds.

1997: Patricia Dittel - exploration of the effects of prenatal stress on non-sexual behaviors in mice.

1997: Kalynn Schulz - exloration of the effects of prenatal stress on gender preference in male mice.

1997: Carolin Merkle - exploration of the effects of estrogen on mating behavior in female meadow voles.

1998: Maureen Sheehan- exploration of prenatal stress as a negative risk factor in maternal behavior in mice.

1999: Debra Smith - exploration of female desire in mice

 

Minority Mentees:

1998: Jing Chan worked on a project dealing with the effects of prenatal

stress on postnatal maternal behavior in mice.

1996: Melanie Larson worked on formulating topics for use in a future

course on the behavioral biology of women.

 

MAPS

1999: Amy Scherbring served as a research and resource person for a class

on behavioral biology of women and found sources for the class as needed.

2000: Jing Chan is developing an experiment to explore the differences

between male and female attraction in mice.

Benjamin Swanson

Stephanie Clay

Wendy Reuer

Phoua Yang

Nicole E. Lapointe

Karen Graupman

Melissa Anderson

Wendy Mortensen

Tanya Peterson

Devon Leppink

'97-'98 Girls' Circle MAI Maureen Sheehan

'98-'99 Girls' Circle MAP Anna Silus

'99-'00 Girls' Circle MAP Christa Stanz

1997-1998 Amber Sellin - gathered information related to drug education and history, as part of preparation for a textbook in "drugs and human behavior."

1996-1997 Melinda Diehl - Evaluation of campus climate for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender students.

 

 

Please list student presentations/performances/artistic exhibitions in your program that took place within the past 5 (or more) years.

Klinger, E., Goetzman, E., Hughes, T., & Seppelt, T. (1996) Microinfluences of protoemotional reactions and motivation on cognitive processing. Invited paper delivered at the annual meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, May 4.

Klinger, E., Goetzman, E., Hughes, T., Seppelt, T., Leppink, D.F., & Peterson., T.A. (1996) Exploring protoemotional involvement in word processing. Invited paper delivered at the symposium on "Emotion and Cognition: Effect on Word Processing" at the quadrennial meeting of the International Congress of Psychology, August, Montreal.

Mortensen, W., E., LaPointe, N.E., Anderson, M.A., & Klinger, E. (1999). Goal -related cues elicit more positive early evoked potentials than other cues. 14th Annual Red River Psychology Conference, March 26, Moorhead, MN.

LaPointe, N.E., & Klinger, E. (1999). ERP evidence for response to goal-related cues within the first 100 ms after stimulus onset. Paper presented at the Minnesota Undergraduate Conference, Carleton College, Northfield, MN.

Ostrowski, N.L., Smalkoski, K., & Stanz, C. (November, 1999). Women and girls: Connected communities for growth. Proposal accepted for presentation at the Annual Faculty Development Conference of the Collaboration for the Advancement of College Teaching and Learning, Bloomington, MN.

Ostrowski, N.L., Smalkoski, K., & Silus, A.M. (1999, February). Service as a pathway to women's intellectual and personal growth. Presented at the Annual Faculty Development Conference of the Collaboration for the Advancement of College Teaching and Learning, Bloomington, MN.

Presentations:

Burda, K. and Meek, L. (1997). The effects of prenatal stress on early development and spatial skills in male mice. National Conference on Undergraduate Research, Austin, TX.

Schulz, K. and Meek, L. (1998). The effects of prenatal stress on gender preference in male mice. Minnesota Undergraduate Psychology Conference, Augsburg College, Minneapolis, MN.

Smith, D.A., Merkle, C.J. and Meek, L.R. (1999). Effects of exogenous estrogen on mating latency in female meadow voles housed in long and short daylengths. National Conference on Undergraduate Research, Rochester, NY.

Dittel, Pl, Sheehan, M. Olson, M. and Meek, L. (1999). Effects of prenatal stress and raising stressed pups on maternal behavior in mice. National Conference on Undergraduate Research, Rochester, NY.

Posters:

Dittel, P., Chan, J., Kjolhaug, S., Kringle, T., LaPointe, N., Maas, M., Rodriquez, R., Sheehan, M. and Meek, L. (1999). Effects of stress and raising stressed young on maternal behavior in mice. 14th Annual Red River Psychology Conference, Moorhead, MN.

Smith, D.A. and Meek, L.R. (1999). Effects of exogenous estrogen on mating latency in female meadow voles exposed to long and short daylengths. Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology, Charlottesville, VA.

 

 

Please list honors and awards that the students in your program earned within the past 5 (or more) years.

 

Please comment on the success of your graduates on professional and graduate program exams.

 

 

Please list participation of your students in special programs such as study abroad, internships etc.

Please present some case studies that present other learning outcomes not reflected elsewhere.