Assessment of Student Learning



UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, MORRIS

Morris, Minnesota

April , 1997





The Plan for

the Assessment

of Student Learning

Web Site: http://www.morris.umn.edu/committees/asl/


Progress Report II

PREPARED BY

THE TASK FORCE ON ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTS' LEARNING MEMBERS:

Bert Ahern

Chair,

Morse Alumni Distinguished Teaching Professor of History
Eric Bass

Vice President for Finance & Operations for Morris Campus Student Association
James Cotter

Morse Alumni Distinguished Teaching Associate Professor of Geology
Edith Borchardt

Associate Professor of German
Nathaniel Hart

Director of Faculty Center for Learning and Teaching,

Professor of English
Thomas Johnson

Associate Professor of Psychology
Jason Kohler

President of Morris Campus Student Association
Carol Marxen

Assistant Professor of Elementary & Secondary Education
Gwen Rudney

Assistant Professor of Elementary & Secondary Education
Sam Schuman

Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs
Engin Sungur

Interim Director of Assessment,

Morse Alumni Distinguished Teaching Associate Professor of Mathematics

APPROVED BY

THE UMM CAMPUS ASSEMBLY ON APRIL 14, 1997

Table of Contents

I. The Context for Planning 2II. The Institutional Mission and Goals 3III. Goals of the Curriculum 4III.1. Process of Liberal Learning 4III.2. Expanding Perspectives 5III.3. The Major 6IV. The Conceptual Framework for the Assessment of Student Learning 6IV.1. Unit Goal/Mission 8IV.2. Learning Objectives 11IV.3. Expected Outcomes 11IV.4. Assessment Methods and Tools 11IV.5. Observed Outcomes 12IV.6. Action 13IV.7. Impact on the Students' Learning 13IV.8. Back to the Unit Goal/Mission 13V. Assessment of the Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Major Programs 15VI. Assessment of the General Education 17VII. Assessment of the Co-curricular Academic Programs 22VIII. Integration of Assessment of Student Learning Activities With Other Campus processes 22IX. Administration of the Assessment Process 23XI. Timetable for Implementation 26appendices 30 List of Units 31Disciplines 31Programs 31Committees 31 Some of the Current Activities Related with the Assessment of Students' Learning 32Institutional (Indirect Measures) 33Discipline/program level(Some examples) 33 Summary of the Discipline Assessment Methods and Tools 36 Discipline Assessment of Students' Learning Plans 39 Assessment of Students' Learning Planning Exercise and Survey for the Disciplines 86 Form for the Assessment of Students' Learning: Unit Plans for the Disciplines 91 Form for the Assessment of Students' Learning: Unit Plans for the Co-curricular Programs 95

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This progress report provides a description of an assessment process which places the faculty, individually and collectively, in charge, and defines an administrative structure which will promote and support assessment activities.

By using various planning tools such as surveys, exercises, meetings, and electronic communications, the plan represents an institution-wide conceptualization of the assessment process shaped by the faculty. The conceptual framework presented in this report has been implemented and tested within the institution and proven to be realistic. The assessment process originates and returns back to the unit mission, goals and objectives. It also considers inter-unit impact of the assessment process and opens up channels which could lead to a change in institution's mission, goal and objectives. Inclusion of all decision making units in the assessment process will definitely increase the likelihood of leading to institutional improvement.

The plan aims to integrate assessment with the academic functions of the institution and to support and strengthen assessment as part of the academic culture. The report shows that assessment is already a part of the academic culture of UMM. At the same time, the campus needs a common language which will ease the communication between units and create an infrastructure which will promote, motivate and support the units. Implementation of the assessment process showed that the timeline is realistic and fast enough to produce reliable input in the direction of institutional improvement. The administration part of the UMM assessment process proposes a unique and innovative unit: Center for Student Learning and Faculty Teaching. This organizational structure places the assessment where it belongs, underscores faculty ownership, and emphasizes that student learning is an outcome of faculty teaching and can not be improved without addressing faculty instructional development.

As it is well known, assessment is an ongoing process. We hope to see many changes in the process which would be an indication of improvement. The plan promotes a modest start and improvement over time by faculty learning from each other, instead of one which promotes a "perfect" plan with a dead-end. The plan also creates an atmosphere in which the faculty will feel comfortable.


I. THE CONTEXT FOR PLANNING

The University of Minnesota, Morris (UMM) is an undergraduate, residential, liberal arts campus of the University of Minnesota with about 2000 students and 120 teaching faculty located in a rural community 150 miles west of the Twin Cities. It offers the academic reputation of the University of Minnesota with the special atmosphere of a small college. Its primary institutional mission is to offer undergraduate education in the liberal arts including licensure programs in teacher education. This mission as a single purpose liberal arts college has not changed since the college was founded in 1960 and reflects its historic values, current strengths, and plans for the future.

Evaluation, appraisal, and assessment of the quality of courses, programs, and services has been practiced at the University of Minnesota, Morris for years. With an active institutional research program, it was clear that substantial outcome-oriented evaluation was already taking place including longitudinal profiling of the student body as a whole, student opinion surveys, follow-up studies of graduates and non-returning students, and analysis of graduation and retention rates. Students evaluate every course. A detailed evaluation of the general education program was recently completed and many disciplines appraised the competency of their majors through cap-stone seminars, tutorials, portfolios, and recitals. Some of the current activities related with the assessment of students' learning are given in the appendix.

The campus is doing a great deal, but these efforts fell short in important ways. For example, the goals of general education and the majors are not directly evaluated through student outcomes, i.e., that students demonstrate that they have acquired the skills, techniques, and knowledge required. Even less frequently are the assessment techniques related directly to well articulated curricular objectives. The results is that of the assessment efforts that are not tied into institutional planning and resource allocation as directly as they should be. Perhaps most important, the results of assessment are not systematically used to improve student learning in a regular, ongoing way.

To overcome some of these shortcomings in the college's assessment activities, a task force made up of faculty and students representative of the governance committees with a major stake in assessment (and supported by staff familiar with the current institutional research efforts), worked during the spring of 1995 to develop a plan specifically to assess student learning across the campus. The group's principal objective was to develop a conceptual model for the assessment which would be generally applicable at each level where student learning and achievement take place. These levels would include the course; the discipline curriculum and major; the general education program and its components; several support programs such as academic assistance, honors, study abroad; and some of the educational, social, and recreational programs of the extracurriculum. The conceptual model was to unify the assessment process across units, in each case beginning with the institutional mission, moving to unit goals and objectives, then to the assessment and analysis phase leading to appropriate action at the individual, unit, or institutional level as the case may be. The process would be controlled through the governance system by the faculty. In addition, rather than an intrusive chore imposed by an outside agency, the process ought to be compatible with the natural responsibilities of faculty members committed to teaching and research in their respective disciplines. After the receipt of reviewer's reports on the proposed plan which ask for revisions, a second task force has been appointed by UMM Campus assembly in the Fall of 1996. The second task force made up of two faculty representatives from Science and Mathematics, Social Science, and Humanities divisions and one faculty from Education Division who were nominated by the divisions, two students, and the Dean of Academic Affairs. The task force has been charged to review the draft UMM Assessment Plan, bring it back to Assembly with any revisions that seem necessary, and take steps to begin the implementation of the plan, fulfilling the duties of the proposed Assessment of Student Learning Committee until its establishment.

The Assessment of Student Learning is a discipline and program-based process aimed at improving the teaching and learning at UMM. It is intended to determine how well what students are actually learning conforms to the objectives of that academic enterprise. Although the assessment process will produce a body of information which will be useful in the preparation of discipline and institutional self-studies, the primary purpose is program improvement. Further, it is the intention of the both task forces that, as a matter of policy, this assessment process should not bear a connection to the college's faculty evaluations for the purposes of promotion, tenure, and salary determination.

II. THE INSTITUTIONAL MISSION AND GOALS

Explicit statements of the institutional mission, goals, and educational objectives are contained in the 1995-97 UMM Bulletin. The formal mission statement, approved by the Campus Assembly in 1993, is as follows:

The mission of the University of Minnesota, Morris as an undergraduate, residential liberal arts college is distinctive within the University of Minnesota. The Morris campus shares the University's statewide mission of teaching, research, and outreach, yet it is a small college where students can shape their own education. The campus serves undergraduate students primarily from Minnesota and its neighboring states, and it is an educational resource and cultural center for citizens of west central Minnesota. Through its instructional excellence, its commitment to research, its numerous extracurricular programs and services, and its strong sense of community, the University of Minnesota, Morris endeavors to achieve its place among the best liberal arts colleges in the region.

III. GOALS OF THE CURRICULUM

The goals of the academic program at the University of Minnesota, Morris are expressed through the requirements for the bachelor of arts degree . The degree requirements consist of three parts, two of which are in general education: Process Requirements and Expanding Perspectives Requirements. The third part is the Major, or field of specialization; its requirements are specified by faculty in each discipline (1995-97 UMM Bulletin, p. 56). The requirements are meant to prescribe student competencies, which are usually demonstrated through the successful completion of qualifying courses but may be met by demonstrating proficiency in other ways.

The first goal of general education is to become familiar with the process of liberal learning--to acquire the intellectual skills, the communication skills, and the framework of knowledge needed for successful advanced work. The second goal is to expand one's intellectual perspectives, gaining enough understanding of the principal areas of human endeavor to be able to continue learning in the future and to have a sense of the limits of one's knowledge. Successful study in a major field, in which one pursues knowledge in depth with the goal of becoming reasonably expert, constitutes the third area required for the B.A. degree.

III. 1.PROCESS OF LIBERAL LEARNING

The Process requirements emphasize the development of intellectual skills, the critical and creative thinking skills, and the communication skills needed for future work. The goals of the process requirements are as follows.

Inquiry, a freshman core course. Introduces students to liberal education; students are expected to gain a sense of community, develop skills of intellectual inquiry, and learn to be active participants in the learning process.

College Writing. Students acquire the basic compositional skills necessary to develop multi-paragraph essays and to write documented papers. Following the introductory course, students develop and apply expository writing skills appropriate to various disciplines.

Speaking. Students develop the skills and understandings necessary to prepare and deliver effective oral presentations before an audience. Students then learn to apply these skills in oral presentations appropriate in various disciplines.

Computing. Students learn to understand the role of computers in society, know how to solve problems using a computer, and how to make productive use of computers to enhance their knowledge and skills in a chosen field.

Foreign Language. Students are introduced to the grammar, the basic skills of reading, writing, and speaking a language other than their own, and to the cultures of the countries speaking that language.

III. 2. EXPANDING PERSPECTIVES

The Expanding Perspectives requirements emphasize the development of breadth in a world of diverse peoples, activities, and values, all increasingly related. All Expanding Perspective courses are intended to actively involve students in the following: understanding how knowledge is acquired, engaging in the process of acquiring knowledge, understanding the influences and assumptions that lead to particular perspectives in a given field, engaging in critical and creative thinking and inquiry appropriate to the field, and pursuing connections to knowledge in other disciplines. The goals of specific Expanding Perspectives requirements are as follows.

The Self and Others. To encourage the development of self-understanding and an understanding of the forces which shape human interactions.

Historical Perspectives. To provide an understanding of the past, the complexity of human affairs, and the way in which various forces--economic, cultural, religious, political, scientific--influence efforts to control the course of these events.

Different Cultures. To introduce students to a culture other than their own.

Social Institutions. To develop an understanding of a method for analyzing modern society or some significant political, economic, religious, social, or scientific component of it.

Analysis and Interpretation of the Arts. To develop an understanding of the principles of aesthetic judgment, including the means for analyzing, interpreting, and evaluating the arts produced by others.

Performance. To introduce students to the creative process through individual performance in an artistic activity such as writing, acting, dance, studio art, and music.

Arts and Culture. To investigate how cultures shape and are shaped by the arts.

The Natural World. To acquaint students with the scientific method as a means of studying the natural world through understanding fundamental scientific concepts and through engaging in scientific analysis and experimentation.

Abstract Systems. To learn to formulate abstractions, employ proofs, and manipulate symbols in formal systems; to use abstract languages with defined rules of deduction to strengthen the student's ability to think logically.

III.3. THE MAJOR

The purpose of the major is to ensure that each student pursues a particular field of knowledge in depth, investigates advanced theories and schools of thought, and becomes competent in using the language and methods of inquiry of the field. Through such concentrated study, conducted over an extended period of time, a student begins to master an existing body of knowledge and understands the nature of expertise in the chosen field, including both its power and its limitations. Each of 27 formally approved majors have certain specific goals defined by the faculty of the disciplines involved.

IV. THE CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING

As designed by the task force, the conceptual model consists of unit assessment cycles as well as an institutional assessment cycle. Units include the course, the discipline curriculum, the major, the general education curriculum or its components, and other programs--for example, Study Abroad--where significant student learning has been identified (a detailed list of units is given in appendix). The overall institutional cycle aims to provide feedback among units to assist them in identifying overlapping student learning needs, and to integrate the results of individual unit assessments. The conceptual framework not only allows the unit assessment cycles to flow from the institution's published mission and goals, but it also creates channels to identify necessary changes in institutional goals.

The key ingredient of the model is the Unit Assessment Cycle, given in Figure 1, which consists of seven elements.

Unit Goal/Mission

Learning Objectives

Expected Outcomes

Assessment Methods and Tools

Observed Outcomes

Action

Impact on the Students' Learning

The cycle may be further divided into a planning phase and an application phase. The planning phase (the right-hand side of the diagram) consists of the determination of learning objectives, the clarification of expected outcomes, and selection and development of assessment methods and tools. The application phase (the left-hand side of the diagram) consists of the observation of the outcomes resulting from the application of the assessment methods, taking actions based on these results, and analyzing the impact on the students' learning of the action(s) taken.

The cycle originates with the unit's goal/mission and returns to this stage as the cycle is completed. Through various actions taken by a unit, the cycle interconnects with cycles from other units and with the institutional assessment cycle as a whole. Since the model cycle will be employed by all the units, the assessment process will be consistent across the campus. In addition, the similarity among assessment cycles will have the beneficial effect of providing multiple measures of effectiveness of the academic program as a whole. Rather than impose a new approach upon units, it is intended that the cycle provides a conceptual framework for assessment which is compatible with appraisals currently being carried out in most units within a less formalized structure.

IV.1. UNIT GOAL/MISSION

The cycle begins with a statement of the mission and goals particular to that unit. While they should be compatible with the institutional mission, the unit goals may be quite specific and initially may not take into consideration the mission and goals of other units. The institutional assessment cycle is designed to integrate the goal and mission of all units. Even if it is not true at the beginning, this dynamic process will in time integrate unit and institutional goals.



FIGURE 1. UNIT ASSESSMENT CYCLE


IV.2. LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Learning objectives will flow from the unit's mission and goals and will be detailed enough to cover the different functions of the unit. Based upon the unit's goals, an individual instructor for a course, or the discipline faculty in the case of a major, will identify the specific learning objectives. They may be as specific as those for a particular course (for example, understanding a cost/benefit analysis) or as general as those for the major (for example, provide students with a basic understanding of the nature and functioning of the economic system).

IV.3. EXPECTED OUTCOMES

Units must next specify, based upon their learning objectives, a variety of expected outcomes, measurable in qualitative or quantitative terms. Depending upon the unit's goals, the expected outcomes may be stated as cognitive, behavioral, or attitudinal characteristics. The outcomes can be as specific as being able to solve differential equations, being able to integrate trigonometric functions, or being able to interpret the results of a factor analysis, or as broad as being able to explain how the development of mathematics has been part of the evolution of civilizations and is intimately interwoven with their cultural and scientific development. At this stage in the assessment cycle the expected outcomes represent predictions of how student learning will be demonstrated.

IV.4. ASSESSMENT METHODS AND TOOLS

Each unit will select or develop its own assessment methods and tools. Assessment methods may be based on descriptive or experimental data collection processes. These methods will include portions of examinations in key courses, the products of capstone experiences, seminars, recitals, locally-developed examinations, surveys, oral examinations, professional licensure examinations, standardized comprehensive examinations, portfolios, alumni follow-up surveys, and the like (please see the Figure 4).

Different units may select and develop differing assessment methods and tools to measure the same or similar expected outcomes. This will have the advantage of creating multiple assessment measures more likely to capture the complete range of student achievements and promote innovative and "better" assessment techniques as their results are shared during the assessment cycles with other units.


IV.5. OBSERVED OUTCOMES

When the assessment method, tools, and techniques have been utilized with the appropriate students, the results will be analyzed by the unit itself and interpreted in terms of the expected outcomes identified earlier during the planning phase. The results will become part of one or more assessment outcome documents. These may include discipline or program self-study reports, annual discipline/division/committee reports, institutional data summaries, accreditation self-study reports.

FIGURE 4. AREAS OF ASSESSMENT AND EXAMPLES OF ASSESSMENT INSTRUMENTS

IV.6. ACTION

Neither the process of appraisal nor knowledge of the results automatically leads to constructive change and improvement. The assessment model must include an action stage, providing for a response to the results of the assessment of student achievement. The most direct action, and that which routinely occurs at the present time, is for the results to be provided to students and used in improving their achievement. Action may occur as the modification by faculty of a course or a discipline curriculum, or by a governance committee of a program or administrative unit. In particular, the assessment process must, as a matter of policy, influence the institution's decision making processes which determine curriculum, pedagogy, and resource allocation. At the action stage, as shown in Figure 2, the cycle provides for sharing recommendations for change based upon documented results of the assessment process.

IV.7. IMPACT ON THE STUDENTS' LEARNING

Once an action has been taken to improve student achievement, its impact will be evaluated to see whether the desired improvement actually occurred. If the proposed action requires a higher unit's involvement the impact of that involvement should be measured and evaluated as well. Note that this stage might call for the application of the assessment tools developed in a previous stage. It may also lead to a change in the unit's mission and goal.

IV.8. BACK TO THE UNIT GOAL/MISSION

One of the outcomes of unit assessment will often be a modification of that unit's statement of missions and goals. An Assessment Committee (see below) will both guide the process and act as a clearinghouse for information and recommendations which emerge from the unit assessment cycles. One of its responsibilities will be to provide information to other units, appropriate governance committees, the administration, and the Campus Assembly, which may result in modifications of units or institutional goals.


GUIDELINES FOR UNIT ASSESSMENT PLANS



These guidelines will be used by the Student Learning Assessment Committee in reviewing the unit assessment plan drafts of learning objectives/expected outcomes and assessment methods.



Unit Mission/Goals(s):


o Plan includes statement of unit mission/goal

o Unit mission/goal relates to institutional mission

Student Learning Objectives/Expected Outcomes:

o Learning objectives/outcomes are stated in terms of important student achievements (e.g., knowledge, skills, behaviors, competencies, and attitudes)

o Outcomes identified are relevant to mission and goals

o A reasonable number of outcomes (3-4) is selected

o Outcomes include at least one cognitive-(knowledge) or performance-based

Assessment Methods & Tools:

o Provides a detailed description of assessment methods that will be used to measure expected outcome

o Defines the measure(s) and instruments that will be used for each expected outcome

o Considers validity and reliability of measures and instruments

The final elements of the plans will be evaluated according to the following guidelines:

Procedure:

o Gives a detailed description of procedure for measuring expected outcome

o Specifies an implementation time line

o Assigns responsibility for data collection and analysis

Possible Use of Observed Outcome and Actions:

o Describes how the results of the assessment will be communicated to faculty

o Identifies mechanisms and processes for using results to improve the student learning and programs

o Has feedback loops to related university processes (e.g., planning (academic and nonacademic, curriculum review)

o Describes how the results of the assessment could change unit mission/goal(s)

Overall:

o Evidence of faculty involvement

o Evidence of student involvement

o Plan will provide information that can be used to improve teaching and learning processes and curricula

o Plan considers effectiveness over time

o Considers effectiveness of important academic processes (e.g., teaching, learning and advising)




V. ASSESSMENT OF THE DISCIPLINARY AND INTERDISCIPLINARY MAJOR PROGRAMS

In November 1996, the Task Force on Assessment of Students' Learning designed and start implementing a series of assessment planning exercises and surveys. The objectives of these exercises and surveys are to;

clarify some of the concepts in assessment of the student learning;

present expectations from the units that are related with the assessment;

motivate units;

initiate a discussion on assessment;

increase faculty involvement and awareness on assessment;

determine some of the assessment activities that are already taking place at UMM;

determine the areas of the assessment with which the units do not feel comfortable;

produce examples of unit assessment cycles that can be shared with other units;

set up connections between different units by clarifying their expectations of each other;

learn how the units are planning to disseminate the results so that the required channels can be opened and be available when needed;

get input from the faculty on the possible functions of the future assessment committee.

The Task Force is planning to use the results of the assessment planning exercises and surveys to:

select some of the responses and ask the units to present them in a meeting(such as Talking about Teaching)

send the response of a unit to a related unit to increase communication, (note that on the survey units will tell with which other units they would like to share the results). The general education part of the responses, for example, can be sent to the general education committee;

prepare a document for the assessment activities in progress and get more detailed information from the units to include on our plan;

design workshops on the areas with which units feel uncomfortable;

provide literature and examples on the areas with which the units feel uncomfortable;

revise the guidelines based on the results;

determine the functions of the assessment committee based on the responses;

group units to gether that have similar objectives and are planning to use similar assessment techniques;

prepare a report on the results and distribute to the all units. This will produce examples and knowledge base generated by the UMM faculty;

keep track of how the unit responses will change throughout time;

determine a time table for the assessment based on the results.

The first of these exercises and surveys was sent to the all UMM faculty (a copy of the survey and cover memo is included in the Appendix). First, program faculty individually filled out the exercise and survey. At the second step responses of each faculty brought up to a discipline meeting at which a joint response of the discipline was prepared. Discipline coordinators submitted the discipline response to the Task Force. The survey showed that the disciplines generally were very comfortable in responding to the questions and that most of the assessment methods and tools were in progress. Through this exercise each discipline stated their mission/goal(s), described how their mission/goal(s) relate to the institutional mission, stated at least three learning objectives and expected outcomes in terms of important student achievements (at least one of which was cognitive(knowledge)- or performance based outcome), provided a description of assessment methods that will be used to measure expected outcome, and proposed a time line including a starting date and anticipated date for the first results. The results of the exercise and survey well documented that the disciplines are carrying out an extensive assessment of their students' learning by using a variety of methods and tools. It also produced many creative in-house examples of the assessment methods and tools. Discipline plans includes assessment strategies which proceeds through classroom techniques, end point assessment (including portfolios, senior seminars, senior thesis, comprehensive exams, exit interviews, standardized tests), discipline specific techniques such as internship supervisor reports, research performance on UROP, MAP, and graduate and post graduate surveys. Some of the assessment information are common to all disciplines , such as GRE scores, placement records, admission to and success in graduate programs, general student attitude survey, graduate/professional school admission tests which are currently collected institutionally. A set of discipline assessment plans, including the responses to the above questions, are provided in the appendix. The Task Force made the discipline plans available electronically on UMM Assessment of Student Learning web page to increase the communication between different disciplines, and to create an atmosphere for the disciplines to learn from each other.

At the second stage the Task Force sent to all faculty another form which included the response of the discipline to the planning exercise and survey, the summary of the assessment methods and tools proposed by all the disciplines, and additional questions related with the use of the observed outcomes, and possible actions, and the implementation needs of the disciplines (a copy of the second form send to the disciplines is included in the appendix).

The results of the discipline assessment process will be collected periodically and disciplines will be given a chance to modify and change their learning objectives, expected outcomes, and assessment methods and tools after the completion of their assessment cycle.

VI. ASSESSMENT OF THE GENERAL EDUCATION

The two main topics that played the important role on the determination of the general education assessment was the approach and timing. The Task Force wants to make sure that the decisions made and implemented in the General Education assessment are ideas coming from the faculty who are directly involved with the general education. Currently, learning objectives for the different general education requirements are approved by the Campus assembly and published in the University Bulletin. To ensure that general education assessment plan is developed and owned by the faculty, approved general education learning objectives will be send to the individual units and faculty in charge of teaching general education courses in each area and these units will be asked to elaborate learning objectives, produce expected outcomes, and suggest appropriate assessment methods and tools. The input from individual units will be integrated and analyzed by the General Education Committee. The Task Force will work closely with the General Education committee. Since the UMM is in the process of switching to semester system in the fall of 1999, learning objectives which will continue to exist and are not currently in place (but eventually be implemented) will be included in the assessment areas.

The following tables summarizes the learning objectives for the quarter and semester systems and identifies the related units (disciplines) that will elaborate objectives and suggest assessment methods.

The Task Force is in a process of creating some assessment methods and tools, such as Assessment of Student Learning Exit Survey/Test, which will produce input to the General Education Committee and test possible directions that can be followed in the future.

GENERAL EDUCATION

Goal/Mission: The first goal of general education is to become familiar with the process of liberal learning--to acquire the intellectual skills, the communication skills, and the framework of knowledge needed for successful advanced work. The second goal is to expand one's intellectual perspectives, gaining enough understanding of the principal areas of human endeavor to be able to continue learning in the future and to have a sense of the limits of one's knowledge. Successful study in a major field, in which one pursues knowledge in depth with the goal of becoming reasonably expert, constitutes the third area required for the B.A. degree.

PROCESS OF LIBERAL LEARNING

The Process requirements emphasize the development of intellectual skills, the critical and creative thinking skills, and the communication skills needed for future work. The goals of the process requirements are as follows.

Learning Objectives (Quarter System) Learning Objectives (Proposed for the Semester System) Related Units
Inquiry, a freshman core course. Introduces students to liberal education; students are expected to gain a sense of community, develop skills of intellectual inquiry , and learn to be active participants in the learning process.(P1) The Common Experience Task Force
College Writing. Students acquire the basic compositional skills necessary to develop multi-paragraph essays and to write documented papers. Following the introducto ry course, students develop and apply expository writing skills appropriate to various disciplines. (P2) College Writing (II.A). To understand the writing process through invention, organization, drafting, revising, and editing; and develop writers who can write about a range of ideas for a variety of readers. English
Speaking. Students develop the skills and understandings necessary to prepare and deliver effective oral presentations before an audience. Students then learn to app ly these skills in oral presentations appropriate in various disciplines.(S) Not in effect
Computing. Students learn to understand the role of computers in society, know how to solve problems using a computer, and how to make productive use of computers to enhance their knowledge and skills in a chosen field.(C1, C2) Ethical and Social Implications of Technology (III.G.4). To broaden and develop students' capacity to question and reflect upon their own and society's values and c ritical responsibilities, and to understand forces, such as technology, which cause us to modify these views and often mandate creation of new ways to solve legal, social and scientific issues. C1. Computer Science
Foreign Language. Students are introduced to the grammar, the basic skills of reading, writing, and speaking a language other than their own, and to the cultures of the countries speaking that language. Foreign Language (II.B.). To develop some fluency in the skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in a second language, and critical insight into another culture. French, German, Spanish

THE EXPANDING PERSPECTIVES

The Expanding Perspectives requirements emphasize the development of breadth in a world of diverse peoples, activities, and values, all increasingly related. All Expanding Perspective courses are intended to actively involve students in the following: understanding how knowledge is acquired, engaging in the process of acquiring knowledge, understanding the influences and assumptions that lead to particular perspectives in a given field, engaging in critical and creative thinking and inquiry appropriate to the field, and pursuing connections to knowledge in other disciplines. The goals of specific Expanding Perspectives requirements are as follows.

Learning Objectives (Quarter System) Learning Objectives (Proposed for the Semester System) Related Units
Group A: The Self and Others. To deepen self-awareness and gain understanding of the forces that shape human interactions.
The Self. To encourage the development of self-understanding and an understanding of the forces which shape human interactions. (E1) Human Behavior, Inner Experience and the Self(III.A.). To increase students' systematic understanding of themselves as functioning humans, their individual similari ties to and differences from others, their awareness of the nature and significance of their conscious experience, and the forces that shape their interpersonal attachments and interactions. (eliminated from requirements in a recent meeting) Anthropology, Education, English, History, French, Interdisciplinary Studies, Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology, Speech
Historical Perspectives. To provide an understanding of the past, the complexity of human affairs, and the way in which various forces--economic, cultural, religious , political, scientific--influence efforts to control the course of these events. (E2) History (III.B.). To increase students' understanding of the past, the complexity of human affairs, the ways in which various forces--economic, cultural, religious, political, scientific-- influence efforts to control events, and the ways historians verify and interpret their findings. Art History, English, Geology, History, Philosophy, Political Science, Theatre
Different Cultures. To introduce students to a culture other than their own. (E3) Anthropology, Education, French, German, History, Humanities, Inter. Stud., Music, Political Science, Sociology, Spanish, Speech
Social Institutions. To develop an understanding of a method for analyzing modern society or some significant political, economic, religious, social, or scientific c omponent of it. (E4) Social Processes and Institutions (III.C.). To increase students' understanding of methods of analyzing modern society or some significant political, economic, reli gious, social or scientific component of it. Anthropology, Computer Science, Economics, Education, English, History, Management, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology,
Group B: The Arts. To encourage the understanding of the principles of aesthetic judgment, including the means for analyzing, interpreting, and evaluating the arts produced by others. Art History, Studio Art, Theatre Arts, Music
Analysis and Interpretation of the Arts. To develop an understanding of the principles of aesthetic judgment, including the means for analyzing, interpreting, and ev aluating the arts produced by others.(E6) Literature, Language and Philosophy (III.D.). To expand students' capacity to understand, analyze, and discuss the complexity of the human condition through the stu dy of human languages, and works of human thought and imagination. Art History, English, French, German, Hum., Music, Philosophy, Spanish, Theatre
Performance. To introduce students to the creative process through individual performance in an artistic activity such as writing, acting, dance, studio art, and mus ic.(E7) Performance (II.D.). To introduce students to the creative process through individual performance, and demonstrate skill in such activities as composition, theatre, dance, studio art, and music. Studio Art, English, French, Music, Theatre, Wellness and Sport Science
Arts and Culture. To investigate how cultures shape and are shaped by the arts.(E8) Fine Arts (III.E.). To develop students' understanding, analysis and appreciation of the arts. Art History, English, History, Hum., Music
The Natural World. To acquaint students with the scientific method as a means of studying the natural world through understanding fundamental scientific concepts and through engaging in scientific analysis and experimentation.(E9) Physical and Biological Science (III.F.). To increase students' understanding of the structure and dynamics of the physical and biological worlds, and of the methods by which such knowledge is garnered. Geology, Physical Science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics,
Abstract Systems. To learn to formulate abstractions, employ proofs, and manipulate symbols in formal systems; to use abstract languages with defined rules of deduction to strengthen the student's ability to think logically.(E10) Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (II.C.). To strengthen students' ability to think logically, employ proofs, and use abstract languages with defined rules of deduction OR To strengthen students' ability to formulate abstractions, employ proofs, and manipulate symbols in formal systems. Computer Science, Mathematics, Philosophy
Non-Western Focus.

Students are introduced to cultures other than those of Western European origin, such as the cultures of Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and the Pacific; the remnants of indigenous cultures of regions presently considered Western, e.g., American Indian and Australian Aborigine; and non-Western cultures that have been brought to or migrated to the West, e.g., African American, Chicano/Latino, and Asian American

Anthropology, Economics, Education, History, Hum., Music, Political Science, Sociology, Speech
Wellness (II.E.). To develop an understanding of, and enable the making of informed decisions concerning human health and fitness. Wellness and Sport Science
The Global Village (III.G.). To increase students' understanding of the growing interdependence of nations, peoples and the natural world.

1. Human Diversity: To increase students' understanding of individual and group differences (e.g. race, gender, class) and their knowledge of the traditions and values of various groups in the United States.

2. People and Environment: To increase students' understanding of the interrelatedness of human society and the natural world.

3. International Perspective: To increase students' systematic understanding of national cultures other than those in which they received their prior schooling.

4. Ethical and Civil Responsibilities. To broaden and develop students' capacity to question and reflect upon their own and society's values and critical responsibilities, and to understand forces, such as technology, which cause us to modify these views and often mandate creation of new ways to solve legal, social and scientific issues.

Anthropology, Economics, Education, History, Hum., Music, Political Science, Sociology, Speech

VII. ASSESSMENT OF THE CO-CURRICULAR ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

UMM Assessment of Student Learning Plan includes units other than the disciplines which are extensively involved with the students' learning. These units are Academic assistance Center, Advising, Athletics, Campus Compact, Computing Services, Gateway Program, Honors Program, International Program, Library, Minority Student Program, MAP/MAI Program, Study Abroad Program, Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program, and University College. These units were asked to fill out a specially designed form (a copy of the form is included in the appendix). Inclusion of these units in the assessment process not only helps to produce a comprehensive plan but also provide channels to integrate different areas where student learning taking place. It will also make it easier for the assessment results to have an impact on the campus planning and resource allocation by creating a common structure and language. Examples of the learning objectives for some of the units in this category is given below:

Study Abroad to provide an education that prepares students to become global citizens by expanding their world view and deeping their understanding of world issues.
Morris Academic Partners Program to enhance students intellectual competence and increase their interest in graduate or professional study.
Advising Set up connections between students and faculty outside the classroom contribute to a successful educational experience
Academic Assistance Center To help students achieve their academic goals, whatever they might be.
Honors Program. To encourage active learning through writing, experimentation, creative activity, or discussion and, if at all appropriate, emphasize primary texts and materials. Honors students must do original work, work that demonstrates a consistently high level of academic commitment. The senior honors project is a substantial scholarly or creative work that shows the student's engagement in the intellectual life of the discipline(s) in which the project is completed.

VIII. INTEGRATION OF ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING ACTIVITIES WITH OTHER CAMPUS PROCESSES

To make assessment a part of the academic culture of the institution it is essential to integrate assessment activities with the other academic activities. Being engaged in a process of moving into a semester system in Fall of 1999, opens up possibilities for this integration. The Curriculum Committee added a new part on assessment to the New and Revised Course Proposal Form. This part asks for a clear and brief statement of the goals of the course and suggestions on how faculty will assess how successful this course is in achieving the described goals. Also, the Discipline Objectives and Requirements Form includes the following two questions: What should students learn in this discipline? and how does discipline measure the extent to which student learning meets disciplinary goals and objectives? These two forms are prepared for all courses and disciplines for the transition to the semester system and will be approved by the Curriculum Committee and the Campus Assembly.

The proposed assessment plan creates a structure which will allow the assessment results to give feedback to discipline, division, and support services 5-year plans, program reviews, and all other decision making units of the Campus.

As it can be seen from the table given in the appendix, UMM is collecting extensive and comprehensive information on institutional effectiveness through various methods and tools. The Task Force is in a process of developing ways of redirecting some of these efforts to assess student learning. As a first step, in the Spring 1997 an Assessment of Student Learning Exit Survey/Test will be integrated with the UMM Bachelor's Degree Candidate Survey.

IX. ADMINISTRATION OF THE ASSESSMENT PROCESS

The assessment of student learning is ultimately a faculty responsibility. The assessment process is to be faculty designed and supervised, with a committee of the Campus Assembly having major responsibility for the program. On November 18, 1996, the UMM Assessment plan and a constitutional By-law amendment proposal establishing the Assessment of Student Learning Committee was presented to the Campus assembly by the Executive Committee for information. The By-law amendment proposal is given below:

BY-LAW AMENDMENT PROPOSAL

Rationale: In keeping with its effort to fulfill its educational mission, UMM seeks to implement a process whereby assessment of student learning occurs in an ongoing manner at every appropriate level and informs the development of educational policy and practice. A standing committee is necessary to assure that this process operates effectively. This committee will help UMM meet Criteria Three from the NCA Accreditation standards.

Membership: The Assessment of Student Learning Committee consists of ten members, including one faculty member from the Division of Education, and two each from the Divisions of Humanities, Science & Mathematics, and Social Sciences, and two students. The Dean or his designee will serve ex officio.

Powers: The Assessment of Student Learning Committee oversees and provides support to all aspects of the assessment process, receives all data and materials generated by assessment activities, recommends improvements in the assessment program and disseminates reports on the results of assessment and the initiatives based on assessment intended to improve student learning.

Technical restraints within the UMM Constitution prevented the operation of a new standing committee until the 1997-98 academic year. To allow the process to move forward this academic year, the Executive Committee recommended to the Campus Assembly the creation of a second Task Force on the Assessment of Student Learning. It solicited nominations for membership from the Division chairs and then forwarded a slate to the Campus Assembly. The Assembly approved the recommendation and selected the membership for the Task Force at its meeting of November 18, 1996. The immediate duties of the Task Force were to review the 1995 Assessment Plan in light of the NCA referee critique and other relevant information, to consult with the faculty and appropriate committees in its review of the plan and bring an Assessment Plan to the Campus Assembly for its approval in Spring, 1997. The Task Force, in carrying the responsibilities of the forthcoming Standing Committee, is also to guide the development and implementation of the assessment process, facilitate unit involvement, provide relevant results to the other governance committees (Curriculum, General Education, Campus resources and Planning, and Scholastic are the most germane) and recommend necessary actions to the Campus Assembly.

On February 3, 1997 the Campus Assembly approved the by-law amendment proposal establishing the Assessment of Student Learning Committee as of September, 1997. Also, on April 14, 1997 Campus Assembly meeting the plan for the assessment of student learning at the University of Minnesota, Morris was discussed and approved unanimously.

The proposed structure of the administration of the assessment process and the place of the Assessment Committee is given in Figure 5. The UMM Assessment of Student Learning model decentralizes decision-making. The function of the Assessment Committee is to assure that each unit has

answered the necessary questions and, where appropriate raise questions for clarification. The unit has the responsibility for design and implementation.

The present model proposes that accountability and quality control comes through the public exercise of responsibility by the unit faculty. In addition to demands of professional integrity, a practical incentive for taking the process seriously will operate via the value of credible assessment approaches in order to buttress the individual unit's efforts to secure approval of policy changes and resources. The challenge to the Task Force and to the units is to refine this model so that assessment activities. including report and review practices, are integral to rather than distractions from the instructional activities of the faculty.

At the present time, the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Dean is responsible for much of the institutional research, evaluation, and appraisal which occurs on the Morris Campus. This activity will continue, since it plays an essential role in resource allocation and in appraising institutional effectiveness for self studies and accreditation reviews. For this reason, the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs will coordinate and provide support for the Committee for the Assessment of Student Learning. On November, 1996 the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs named Engin Sungur, Associate Professor of Mathematics, as Interim Director of Assessment.

The Task Force discussed the budgeting issues related with the assessment of student learning activities and supported the proposal prepared by the Dean Schuman submitted to the central administration. The proposal asks for a support for a unique and innovative "Center for Student Learning and Faculty Teaching" which will bring together these two efforts administratively, as, in fact, they are inseparably linked in actuality: How the faculty teaches is obviously a major factor in how students learn. Improving the quality of teaching is helped immeasurably by understanding how students are learning. It is proposed to create a unified office for both these functions, with an integrated support and material budget, and two cooperating faculty coordinators. A single support staff person would serve the integrated program. Joint programs would be offered, and would continue as well the new, and newly successful, individual efforts in assessment of student learning and faculty development. The total budget proposed for the Center for the two years is $190,500.

FIGURE 5. PROPOSED STRUCTURE FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE ASSESSMENT PROCESS

XI. TIMETABLE FOR IMPLEMENTATION

A detailed timeline for the first cycle of the assessment process is given in the following table. The first cycle includes stages such as organization, planning, application, dissemination, and overall assessment of the assessment of students' learning process. The organization stage consists of activities which will maximize the faculty involvement and create an atmosphere which will make the assessment a crucial part of the institutions academic culture. Two of the key activities at this stage are the Assessment of Students' Learning Planning Exercises and Surveys which were sent to all the faculty, and setting up a web site. The UMM Assessment of Learning web site includes progress report, surveys & exercises, unit assessment plans, and Task Force meeting minutes. In the future it will also include the results of the assessments that will be received from the units. This electronic page will increase the communication between units and create an environment that motivates and encourages units toward the assessment.

At the next stage each unit developed their assessment plan based on the guidelines that were developed by the Assessment Committee and submited them to the Committee by April, 1997. The unit assessment plans reviewed by the Task Force on Assessment and other related committees will shape the details of the UMM Assessment Plan. Some preliminary results of the assessment from the units will be available by the end of October, 1997. With this, the dissemination stage of the process will begin. The assessment results will be disseminated across the units and the Committee will help to move the results through the appropriate channels so that substantial impact on the improvement of the students' learning can take place and appropriate input for the campus planning and resource allocation can be generated.

The last stage of the first cycle is the overall assessment of the UMM Assessment of Students' Learning Process. The Assessment of Students' Learning Committee will also work on the unit assessment cycle and develop a goal/mission, learning objectives, expected outcomes, and assessment methods and tools to assess the overall effectiveness of the assessment process. This unit will determine the problems, discuss successes and failures, provide evidence on impact of the process on the students' learning, and most important of all will carry out an academic cost/benefit analysis. A report on the overall assessment of the process will be prepared and distributed to the faculty and all other related units including the NCA.

The following cycles will include planning revision and updating, application, dissemination, and overall assessment of the process stages. The length of each cycle will be proposed by the Committee based on the inputs from the units' experiences on the first cycle.



SUMMARY OF THE ASSESSMENT TIME TABLE

Organization Nov. '96-

Jan. '97

Set up Assessment CommitteeFeb. '97
Meet with CommitteesJan. '97
Create a Web SiteDec. '96
Budget for the assessment ActivitiesJan. '97
Planning Jan. '97-

May. '97

Planning Survey & Exercise (Disciplines) Feb. '97
Unit Assessment Plans

Disciplines

Co-curricular Academic Programs

Apr. '97
General Education Assessment PlanJune '97
Integration with Institutional Effectiveness May. '97
Implementation Oct. '97-

Nov. '97

Unit Implementation Reports

Disciplines

Co-curricular Academic Programs

Nov. '97
General EducationNov. '97
Dissemination Nov. '97-

Dec. '97

Dissemination of Assessment results across the units Dec. '97
Moving the Results through Appropriate Channels Dec. '97
Overall Assessment of the Assessment Process Oct. '97-

Dec. '97

Determination of Problems Dec. '97
Looking for Evidence on Impact of Assessment on Student Learning Dec. 97
Academic Cost & Benefit AnalysisDec. '97
Beginning of the Next Cycle Jan. '97



APPENDICES


LIST OF UNITS

SOME OF THE CURRENT ACTIVITIES RELATED WITH THE ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTS' LEARNING

SUMMARY OF THE DISCIPLINE ASSESSMNET METHODS AND TOOLS

DISCIPLINE ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTS' LEARNING PLANS

ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTS' LEARNING PLANNING EXERCISE AND SURVEY FOR THE DISCIPLINES

FORM FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTS' LEARNING: UNIT PLANS FOR THE DISCIPLINES(AN EXAMPLE)

FORM FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTS' LEARNING: UNIT PLANS FOR THE CO- CURRICULAR PROGRAMS

LIST OF UNITS

Disciplines
Art History Geology Social Science
Studio Art German Sociology
Biology History Spanish
Economics & Management Latin American Areas Studies Speech Communication
Chemistry Liberal Arts for the Human Services Theater Arts
Computer Science Mathematics Wellness and Sport Science
Elementary Education Music Women's Studies
Secondary Education* Philosophy
English Physics
European Studies Political Science
French Psychology

Programs
Academic Assistance Center International Program
Advising Library
Athletics Minority Student Program
Campus Compact MAP/MAI Program
Computing Services Study Abroad Program
Gateway Program Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program
Honors Program University College

Committees
Campus Resources and Planning Committee Minority Experience Committee
Curriculum Committee Freshman Year Experience Committee
Scholastic Committee International Program Committee
General Education Committee Honors Program Committee
Teacher Education Committee

SOME OF THE CURRENT ACTIVITIES RELATED WITH THE
ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTS' LEARNING

Institutional (Indirect Measures)
Activity
Year
Comments
New Student Profile
U of M New Students Characteristics by College

ACT profile of new freshmen

ACE/UCLA (Astin) Survey of new freshmen

ACT Research Service Report of validity & achievement

College Choice & Family Ed Survey

'88, '89, '90, '91, '92, '93, '94, 95, 96

'88, '89, '90, '91, '92, '93, '94, 95, 96 '88, '91, 93, 96

'88, '89, '90, '91, '92, '93, '94, 95, 96

'88, '89, '90, '91, '92, '93, '94, 95, 96

'91, '93, '95

Quality and characteristics of new freshmen class; effectiveness of admissions program; validity of HSR, ACT and other tests
Student Opinion Surveys
ACT Student Opinion Survey (all students)

UMM Degree Candidate Survey (Seniors only)

'89, '94, 98

'88, '89, '92, '95

Opinion of quality services and instruction, general education and major
Retention and Graduation Rates Retention and graduation data
Freshmen cohorts '88, '89, '90, '91, '92, '93, '94, 95, 96
Minority student cohorts '88, '89, '90, '91, '92, '93, '94, 95, 96
Follow-ups
Follow of UMM dropout/non-returning students

Annual follow-up of graduates of UMM

'88, '95

'88, '89, '90, '91, '92, '93, '94, 95, 96

Reasons for leaving

Occupation, Post Grad. Educ. and values

Student/faculty program evaluations
Student evaluations of each course

Student and instructor evaluation of inquiry

Faculty and student assessment survey of ProsPer

Faculty Program Self-Assessment Survey

Discipline Profiles of instructional data

'88, '89, '90, '91, '92, '93, '94, 95, 96

'88, '89, '90, '91, '92, '93, '94, 95

'92

'89, '96

'88, '89, '90, '91, '92, '93, '94, 95, 96

Opinion of quality of instruction

Opinion of quality of instruction

Opinion on Gen. Ed.

Inst. climate, workload, research efforts

Quantitative data on instructional effort compared among disciplines

....................
Discipline/program level  (Some examples)
Activity Comments
Discipline evaluations of senior student performance
Teacher Education Division of Education writing proficiency test

Minnesota Board of Teaching Preprofessional Skills Test

Faculty interviews and recommendations

Studio Art Participation in Senior Exhibit is required for graduation

Participation in Junior Review and Senior Review

JUNIOR REVIEW: Review by the studio art and art history faculty of the student's work to date.

SENIOR REVIEW: Review by the studio art and art history faculty of the student's work, concentrating on the major media and including any work designated at the Junior Review.

Biology Senior seminar. Required for graduation
Chemistry Senior seminar. Required for graduation
English Placement examination
Foreign Languages Proficiency/Placement examination
Geology Geology Senior Seminar. Required for graduation.
History The students must submit a file of materials to present evidence of meeting four learning objectives and expected outcomes stated by the discipline. The file need not be limited to materials produced in history courses. In the year before graduation, the student and the adviser assess progress toward the major and, consulting with the remainder of the history faculty, determine what work remains to be completed for the major.
Honors Program The senior honors project. Each project is presented to the UMM community of scholars in a fashion appropriate to its nature (e.g., public presentation, archived paper, performance, or exhibit)
Mathematics Placement examination. Assessment of the Calculus sequence. Alumni survey. Self-study report prepared for external reviewers.

Senior Project: Each student prepares a project under the direction of a faculty member and presents a written and oral report.

Music Senior Project: A culminating activity that allows a graduating student to demonstrate competence as a musician.
Philosophy Senior Philosophical Thesis: Development of a significant paper on an approved topic under the direction of one or more members of the philosophy staff.
Psychology Students should complete an approved research project for graduation.
Social Science Competencies: The faculty of each field of study in the social sciences has established a set of minimum competencies that ask a student to understand the ways in which the discipline structures and advances knowledge, raises and answers analytic questions, and deals with competing theories and changing nature of the field.
Spanish Proficiency/Placement examination
Speech Communication Students complete a significant paper or project on an approved topic.
Theatre Arts At least one para-programmatic theatre experience that is arranged through a theatre arts faculty member which may take any number of forms, e.g., an internship with a theatre company, study abroad, or theatre tour to New York or London is required for graduation.

Senior Project: Culminating activity to demonstrate the student's competence in some areas of theatre arts. Projects may be completed independently (e.g., a research paper, a solo acting performance) or as part of a group effort.

Women's Studies Students must submit a file of materials to demonstrate the following: (1) familiarity with different theoretical approaches to the study of women; (2) ability to analyze, interpret, and synthesize women's studies materials; (3) awareness of how a knowledge of women's studies relates to the individual's personal life and intellectual growth,

SUMMARY OF THE DISCIPLINE
ASSESSMENT METHODS AND TOOLS


DisciplineAssessment Methods & Tools
Art HistoryMonitored progress of majors(small scale of campus and 3 faculty in the discipline facilitates this process), critical reviews of the local art exhibits, internships, performance in MAP, UROP, admission to graduate programs, performance in graduate programs, success in employment, specially designed exams, course assessment
Studio ArtClassroom observation, tests, pre and post testing, class and individual critiques, portfolio reviews, individual review by the faculty of all junior and senior art students, and all student and senior exhibi tions
BiologyExams, lab reports, term papers, presentations, class participation, senior seminar, independent exams (GRE, MCAT, VCAT, etc.), success as graduates (as reported by independent contacts and work of UMM admini strative offices), assessment in core courses, assessment of communication skills in Biological Communications I & II and senior seminar
ChemistryCourse assessment, research project and/or senior seminar, lab. reports, lab. notebooks, survey of graduates, acceptance rates, success rates in obtaining teaching/research fellowships, survey of graduating majors
Computer ScienceCourse assessment, quality & quantity of presentations and publications, quality & quantity of non-classroom experience
Elementary EducationVideo-taped lessons, observations by faculty, pre-professional skills test, blind scored writing proficiency essay, portfolio, case studies, research papers, Human Relations Competency essays, at tendance and participation in multicultural events, rubrics, student self-evaluations, article reviews from professional journals, essay on philosophy of education, journals and logs
Secondary EducationVideo-taped lessons, observations by faculty, pre-professional skills test, blind scored writing proficiency essay, portfolio, case studies, research papers, Human Relations Competency essays, attend ance and participation in multicultural events, rubrics, student self-evaluations, article reviews from professional journals, essay on philosophy of education, journals and logs
EnglishTesting, portfolios, self-reports, exit interviews, capstone experiences, presentations
FrenchContinuous in-class assessment, journals, analytical papers, spontaneous oral exams, research, performance on UROP, MAP, contributions to public fora and historical achieves, admission to graduate schools
GeologyConventional course assessment, GRE exams, geologic field book, senior seminar, performance in MAP, UROP, other presentations, post-graduate survey
GermanSpecially designed tests, reports by students, verbal interaction in class discussions, papers & essays, journals
HistoryTranscript analysis, portfolio(major file), essays (autobiographical and other), follow-up survey of graduates,
Latin American Areas StudiesTranscript analysis, quarterly seminar, student journals, instructor observations
Liberal Arts for the Human ServicesAssessment in core courses, internship assessed by field supervisor/journal/paper, career track of graduates
MathematicsPortfolio, placement exams, gateway/proficiency exams, survey of graduates, senior seminar, Putnam performance, specially designed exams, professional exams, GRE scores, graduate school acceptance rates, teaching licensure exams, self-report of learning, course projects, MAP/UROP/Campus Compact reports
PhilosophySenior thesis, specially designed exams, quizzes and papers, class discussions, presentations, one-to-one oral exchanges
PhysicsCourse assessment, lab reports, senior presentation
Political ScienceComprehensive exam in major/portfolio, student attitude survey, graduate/professional school admission tests
PsychologyGRE Psychology, exams, research projects, tutorial course/UROP/MAP, completion of core courses
SociologyCourse assessment, capstone independent project, capstone courses, admission to and success in graduate programs,
SpanishPortfolio including literary papers and audio tapes, unobstrusive measures, specially designed exams, presentations/speeches
Speech CommunicationThe capstone senior seminar, transcript analysis, portfolio, video tape record
Theater ArtsConventional testing and evaluation, portfolio, senior project, assessment of theatrical performance, audience response
Wellness and Sport ScienceTesting and judgment of participation, supervisor evaluation, pre and post fitness & wellness testing, testing and performance evaluations based on American Red Cross guidelines









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