Assessment of Student Learning



Music Discipline


Unit Mission/Goal(s)

Please state your unit’s mission/goal(s):

Some of the goals of the music discipline are to advance the learning of the music majors in six common areas: 1) music theory, 2) ear-training/sight-singing, 3) keyboard/computer proficiency, 4) history and literature, 5) performance, and 6) advanced performance.

Please describe how your unit mission/goal(s) relate to the institutional mission

The University of Minnesota is dedicated to the advancement of learning, and the above goals of the music discipline relate to this institutional mission.

 

Student Learning Objectives/Expected Outcomes

Learning Objective 1.

Music theory competency; music 1121-1122-1123

CORE STUDIES I: Music theory; music 1131-1132-1133

CORE STUDIES II: Advanced music theory, a two-year sequence. This learning can generally be described as cumulative--new concepts building

upon and depending on earlier learned concepts.

Expected Outcome 1.

Daily assignments utilize and reinforce newly-presented theory concepts (for example, intervals; triad structures; formal design units such as motives, phrases, periods; voice leading principles; 7th chords; secondary dominant; etc.)

 

 

Learning Objective 2.

Ear-training/sight-singing competency;

music 1124-1125-1126

CORE STUDIES I: Ear-training and sight-singing; music 1134-1135-1136

CORE STUDIES II: A two-year sequence. Ear-training and sight-singing embody the important skills associated with music theory concepts.

Expected Outcome 2.

Ear-training and sight-singing embody the important skills associated with music theory concepts. Classroom activities consist of intensive dictation drills in the several parameters of music: rhythm, melody, and harmony.

Learning Objective 3.

Keyboard/computer proficiency

 

Expected Outcome 3.

Keyboard proficiency:

Students should demonstrate the ability to:

a) sight-read a four-part grand staff hymn at a reasonable speed (c. mm.60),

b) sight-read any solo transposed orchestral instrument part as it would sound in concert pitch,

c) sight-read any two parts of a string or orchestral work in four-part open score notation with viola clef and sight-read any two parts of a four-part choral work with the tenor part notated in treble clef,

d) at the keyboard accurately transpose a four-part eight measure piano score to another nearby key,

e) improvise a short work of eight to sixteen measures in a diatonic key or in dorian, phrygian, lydian or mixolydian mode,

f) play a chordal accompaniment from standard diatonic chord numbers and play a chordal accompaniment from standard chord letters,

g) harmonize a diatonic or modal melody,

h) modulate using standard pivot modulations and modulate using leading tone modulations,

i) in modulating be able to play the primary chords in four-part harmony to establish any major or minor key in arrangements more complex than just I, IV, V, I, and

j) play a standard second year piano teaching repertoire composition well

Computer proficiency:

a) read, comprehend, and perform tasks from a sequencer software tutorial and from the manual; and from keyboard controller and a sound module manual,

b) set up the interface and wire up a MIDI system with both computer cables and MIDI cables,

c) trouble shoot a MIDI system that is not functioning correctly,

d) play and capture an eight to sixteen measure improvisation on a MIDI system,

e) quantize a MIDI improvisation or composition,

f) arrange a MIDI work of eight to sixteen measures for multiple tracks and instruments,

g) assemble a sectional MIDI work of sixteen to thirty-two measures into one unified composition,

h) print out a multiple-part score of at least four parts with full score and separate parts,

i) add musical nuance to a score for performance through velocity, tempo, and continuous controller functions, and

j) create a MIDI composition suitable for performance on the concert of student MIDI works at the end of the semester

Learning Objective 4.

Music history and literature competency

 

Expected Outcome 4.

Students should demonstrate the ability to:

a) chronologically place each musical style period

6th to 11th c. Medieval; 12th and 13th c. Ars Antigua; 14th c. Ars Nova; early 15th c. Burgundian; late 15th and 16th c. Renaissance; 17th c. Early Baroque; early 18th c. High Baroque; later 18th c. Classic; 19th c. Romantic; late 19th c. Impressionistic; early 20th c; and later 20th c.,

b) identify primary style characteristics and genre for each style period,

c) identify and describe four to six individual differences in compositional style of major composers within a style period,

d) using texture, motivic, melodic, harmonic, rhythmic, formal, and other factors be able to analyze a score and state where it fits and deviates from its style period,

e) chronologically trace the musical characteristic of the development and coherence of a style and its genre, and

f) recognize masterworks of a style and be able to state three to six qualities that contribute to masterworks of that style

Learning Objective 5.

Performance competency

 

Expected Outcome 5.

Students should demonstrate improved tone production, intonation, musicianship (e.g., phrasing, dynamics, etc.), rhythmic execution, repertoire knowledge, and other performance facets indigenous to each performing medium

Learning Objective 6.

Advanced performance competency

Expected Outcome 6.

Students should demonstrate an advanced level of tone production, intonation, musicianship, rhythmic execution, repertoire knowledge, and other idiomatic considerations of the specific performing medium

 

Assessment Methods & Tools

Method(s), Measure(s), and Instrument(s) for Expected Outcome 1.

Assessment is an ongoing and frequent measuring process. It includes 1) daily assignments; 2) unit tests; 3) a final exam at the end of each academic term (quarter or semester). Daily assignments measure immediate working knowledge of them. Unit tests measure the ability to retain learned concepts and organize related concepts in a meaningful way. The final exam seeks to measure retention and application of theory concepts as they relate to overall musicianship.

Outcome 1

Starting Date for the Implementation

September, 1998

Anticipated Date for the First Results:

December, 1998

Method(s), Measure(s), and Instrument(s) for Expected Outcome 2.

The classroom drills provide daily opportunities for interactive assessment between faculty and students one-on-one. The classroom drills are followed up with similar audio-tape assignments, providing ongoing assessment on a more formal level. A mid-term and final exam provide a check on student progress each term (quarter or semester).

Outcome 2

Starting Date for the Implementation:

September, 1998

Anticipated Date for the First Results:

December, 1998

Method(s), Measure(s), and Instrument(s) for Expected Outcome 3.

Keyboard labs:

1) daily playing and written assignments,

2) quizzes every two weeks combining written as well as one-on-one playing tests, and

3) a written and playing final test

Computer:

1) spot quizzes on concepts and techniques from manuals, 2) weekly MIDI composition projects on disc for evaluation,

3) daily observation and evaluation of skills, and

4) end of semester public concert composition

Outcome 3

Starting Date for the Implementation:

September, 1998

Anticipated Date for the First Results:

December, 1998

Method(s), Measure(s), and Instrument(s) for Expected Outcome 4.

1) Spot reading quizzes once or twice a week, 2) listening identification and short essays about every three weeks, 3) short answer and essay unit tests about every three weeks, 4) historical analysis paper each semester, and 5) cumulative short answer and essay final

Outcome 4

Starting Date for the Implementation:

September, 1998

Anticipated Date for the First Results:

December, 1998

Method(s), Measure(s), and Instrument(s) for Expected Outcome 5.

Individual performance studies provide assessment opportunities on a one-on-one basis every week. At the end of each academic term, each student performs a final exam for all of the music faculty in that particular performance area. The culminating assessment for lower division students is the jury examination. The music faculty, as a group, listen to each individual student perform a varied repertoire for the jury program. Each faculty member then writes an assessment of the performance. Then a music faculty group assessment occurs as to whether the student should be placed at the advanced level of individual performance study.

Outcome 5

Starting Date for the Implementation:

September, 1998

Anticipated Date for the First Results: December, 1998

 

 

 

Method(s), Measure(s), and Instrument(s) for Expected Outcome 6.

Advanced individual performance studies provide assessment opportunities as stated in Outcome 5, but now these assessments are in terms of advanced performance ability. Also, the culminating assessment takes the form of a senior project, most typically a performance recital. Again, the music faculty meet as a group following the performance and assess the quality of the recital. A determination is then made whether to pass or not pass the student for that particular performance.

Outcome 6

Starting Date for the Implementation:

September, 1998

Anticipated Date for the First Results:

December, 1998




Use of Observed Outcomes and Possible Actions

Please comment on the possible use of the findings of your assessment plan.

In responding to this question you may want to consider the following issues; How would the results of the assessment be communicated to faculty in your own and other disciplines? How could the results be used to improve the student learning and programs? How could the results produce input to other related processes (e.g., academic and nonacademic planning, curriculum review)? How could the results of the assessment change your unit’s mission/goal(s)? With which other units would you like to share the results of your assessment?

1) We would share them (results of the assessment) in a discussion session. It could be an open meeting if faculty outside of music want to participate.

2) If the results indicate the students are learning what we want them to learn, we will proceed in the same fashion. When we learn what weaknesses exist, we can make modifications to correct those weaknesses.

3) Again, as we learn what weaknesses exist, we can make modifications to correct those weaknesses.

4) If we need to substantially alter the curriculum to get desired results, we will have to devote the necessary time and energy to make those changes.

5) All other units are welcome to the results of the music assessment.

 

The Implementation Needs

Please comment on the information and assistance necessary for the successful implementation of your assessment process.

In responding to this question you may want to consider issues like: What are the other units (e.g., other disciplines, programs, administrators and/or committees) that should produce input for the successful completion of your assessment cycle? What type of input do you need from other units? What should be the function of the Assessment of Student Learning Committee and Coordinator to increase the effectiveness of your unit’s assessment process? What type of support might your unit need for the planning and application of your assessment cycle?

1) We will need other units to produce input regarding the data needed for the Appendices.

2) Again, we will need input from other units regarding the data needed for the Appendices.

3) Review the responses on this form and strengthen them.

4) Again, in answering questions from the Appendices, some research needs to be done so the data requested can be accurate.



Application: Observed Outcomes

Please comment on your findings of the implementation of the assessment methods and tools.

In responding to this question you may want to summarize your findings, provide data that supports your interpretations, discuss the validity of your results, and suggest ways of improving the methods and tools that you have used.

We anticipate December 1998 to be the date for the first results.



Actions Taken

Please comment on the actions that you have taken or are planning to take based on your findings.

In responding to this question you may want to consider the following issues; What other units were involved with the actions that you have taken? What was the impact of the actions that you have taken on the students’ learning? What other structures do you propose to increase the success of your actions?

We need to see how our graduates fare on the survey to know what alterations we need to make.



Appendices

You may want to provide the following optional information that may be relevant to your unit’s assessment of student learning plan.

Please list the graduates of your program who are (were) in the graduate programs and provide approximate acceptance rate for your graduates.

We will need to have other units provide the data for the Appendices.