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Echoes of Cry of the Marsh, produced by Media Services, to air on Twin Cities Public Television

Posted by Judy Korn on Tuesday, Apr. 13, 2010


Twin Cities Public Television (TPT) has announced that Echoes of Cry of the Marsh, a documentary produced at the University of Minnesota, Morris, has been scheduled for airing in April 2010. Serving the 15th largest television market in the United States, according to Nielsen Media Research, Inc., TPT has a potential viewing audience of 1.7 million households.

Echoes of Cry of the Marsh explores the issue of wetland restoration through the eyes of Bob Hartkopf, a citizen who has worked more than 40 years to restore the marsh near his family farm in rural Minnesota. In the 1960s, Hartkopf produced a short film called Cry of the Marsh. With a 16mm camera, Hartkopf created a portrait of drained wetlands, devastated wildlife, flood-prone conditions, and an environment cutoff from humans. It was first shown on Earth Day 1970.

To be shown on TPT as Earth Day 2010 programming, Echoes of Cry of the Marsh, continues Hartkopf’s story and evaluates the status of today’s wetlands and restoration programs in the upper Midwest and along the Mississippi River.

The documentary will air on Channel 2 on Tuesday, April 20, at 11 p.m., on Wednesday, April 21, at 5 a.m., and on Sunday, April 25, at 4 p.m.

Echoes of Cry of the Marsh is about one man’s passion for protecting the biodiversity of wetlands,” says Roger Boleman, director of media services at the University of Minnesota, Morris. “It goes beyond the mere technicalities of wetland restoration and focuses on the symbiotic relationship between humans and our environment.”

The documentary is a collaborative effort among several public and private groups, including the Morris campus, the Upper Minnesota Watershed District, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Clean Up the River Environment (CURE). It has also been shown on Pioneer Public Television and Alabama Public Television, and used as a resource for the Minnesota Environment and Natural Resources Committee in St. Paul.