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Joseph Hartmann named National Wildlife Federation Campus Ecology Fellow

Posted by Elaine Simonds-Jaradat on Thursday, Mar. 31, 2011


Joseph Hartmann ’12, Roseville, was named a National Wildlife Federation (NWF) Campus Ecology Fellow for 2011, becoming the first NWF Fellow from the University of Minnesota, Morris (UMM). The Campus Ecology Fellowship Program allows recipients to pursue their vision of an ecologically sustainable future through tangible projects to confront global warming on campus and in the community, and to develop leadership skills. The fellowship includes $1,000 to support Hartmann’s goals of convening a regional sustainability event and developing and refining UMM’s green tour program.

Working with UMM sustainability coordinator Troy Goodnough, who nominated him for the award, Hartmann will help facilitate the Upper Midwest Association for Campus Sustainability (UMACS) regional conference to be hosted by the University on September 23–24, 2011. Under the theme creating change together, the conference will focus on forging new partnerships, expanding diversity, and using campuses as teaching tools and learning laboratories.

Hartmann plans to incorporate a green energy tour into the conference as an introduction to the Green Ambassadors program. Green Ambassadors is a student led program that will provide students, community members, and visitors with “an in depth perspective of our sustainability project development at Morris, especially our renewable energy work,” says Hartmann. About 10 potential ambassadors are in training to conduct the tours. Hartmann will use the fellowship specifically to develop, refine, and codify the green tour protocol.

Karen Mumford, assistant professor of biology and environmental studies, who co-nominated Hartmann, attests that “Joe’s selection as UMM’s first NWF Campus Ecology Fellow is well deserved. He brings to this prestigious program a breadth and depth of skills, intellectual drive, and genuine dedication to sustainability. He is a wonderful representative of UMM and will contribute to advancing our sustainability and energy initiatives and ensuring a successful sustainability conference.”

Hartmann arrived on campus expecting to study business, but soon was “caught by the idea of sustainability” and switched to environmental studies and biology. Inspired by the University’s commitment to looking for solutions, he also became involved in the composting project, reasoning that instead of paying someone to take the garbage away, it could be repurposed without additional cost.

Each of these projects will further Hartmann’s stated long-term objective of “creating a model for other colleges and universities and supporting the national campus greening movement.”

Since its launch in 1989, National Wildlife Federation’s Campus Ecology Program has worked with the college campus community (students, faculty, administrators and staff) to promote sustainability and ecological stewardship on campuses and beyond.