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UMM Home > Career Services > Career Planning & Decision Making > What can I do with a Major in... > Mathematics

Mathematics

Description of Major
The mission of the discipline is to advance knowledge of mathematics: by teaching in mathematics and its processes, by research in mathematics and mathematical pedagogy, and by dissemination of this knowledge to students and the community we serve.

Skills
A liberal arts education and study in a particular major will lead to the acquisition of a group of skills which enable one to solve problems, communicate effectively, and perform complicated tasks. These skills are essential in any career. The following is a list of important and commonly agreed upon career skills identified by UMM mathematics faculty as a part of the project to Improve Public Understanding of Liberal Learning (IMPULL). The skills are those which all or most students studying mathematics are likely to acquire through classroom instruction, co-curricular or extra-curricular activities.
 
 

Leadership/Management Skills:
- judging
- ability to work self-directedly
- making decisions
- analyzing
- identifying problems and needs
- identifying priorities and parameters
- organizing
-managing time, energy and resources
effectively
- conceptualizing
- initiating projects or ideas
- making and keeping a schedule
- identifying alternative courses of action

 
 

Communication/Writing Skills:
-summarizing

 
 

Instructing/Educational Skills:
- explaining
-teaching a skill, concept or principle to
others

- ability to hear and answer questions
perceptively

 
 

Research/Analytical Skills:
- compiling and selecting information
- manipulating information using expertise
in mathematics
- understanding and using organizing
principles
- manipulating information using expertise
in computer skills
- calculating
- applying appropriate methods to test
the validity of data
- formulating questions to clarify a
particular problem or issue
- applying information creatively to solve
specific problems
- reading
- using numbers as a reasoning tool
- designing an experiment, plan or model
that systematically defines a problem
- analyzing the interrelationships of
events and ideas from several perspectives

 
 

Artistic/Creative Skills:
- visualizing spatial relationships
- illustrating, displaying, creating two or
three dimensional images
- dealing creatively with symbols or
images
- aware of the value of symbolism skill in
symbol formation

 
 

Technical/Manual Skills:
- using computers  

 
 

Jobs Obtained by UMM Mathematics Graduates
Studies conducted by the UMM Career Center have shown that graduates obtain jobs that are both related to their major and jobs that may not be formally related to the major. Approximately 77% of the mathematics graduates from 1964-1998 said their job was in the same field or related to their undergraduate major. Other studies have shown that liberal arts graduates find employment that makes use of their skills, special knowledge, values, and interests, even though the employment field may not be related to their academic major. Listed below are some jobs obtained by UMM mathematics graduates:

Account Clerk
Accountant
Accounting Financial Officer
Actuary
Administrative Analyst
Administrative Assistant
Analyst
Application Programmer
Appraiser
Assistant Professor
Assistant Superintendent of Schools (Business/Finance)
Assistant VP-MIS
Auditor
Banking Statistician/Analyst
Biostatistician
Bookkeeper
Bridge Worker
Building Facility Manager
Business Analyst
Calculations
Certified Public Accountant
Chemical Engineer
Claims Examiner
Client Advisor
College Administrator
College Professor
Computer Analyst
Computer Consultant
Computer Engineer
Computer Information Analyst
Computer Network Manager
Computer Program Analyst
Computer Programmer
Computer Scientist
Computer Systems Dev. Manager
Computer Technical Support
Consultant
Data Administrator
Data Analysis Consultant
Data Entry Supervisor
Data Modeler
Database Administrator
Database Analyst
Dentist
Director, Information Systems
Director, Product Marketing
Electrical Engineer
Electronic Engineer
Engineer
Engineer Change Analyzer
Engineering Program Manager
Environmental Science
Executive Assistant
Executive Secretary
Farmer
Finance Consultant
Finance Officer
General Manager
Geographer
Graphic Arts Consultant
Human Resources Director
Investment Systems Technologist
Information Resource Analyst
Information Resource Manager
Information Services Manager
Information Technology Analyst
Information Technology Director
Insurance Adjuster
Insurance Analyst
Insurance Executive
Insurance Sales
Lawyer
Librarian
Management Trading & Marketing
Manager
Manager, Graphic Arts
Manager, Information Systems
Market Researcher
Marketing Analyst
Marketing Data Analyst
Materials Director
Meteorologist
MIS Director
MIS Officer
Mortgage Banker
Physicist
Pilot (Military)
Postal Carrier
President / CEO
Principal, Middle School
Professor, Exercise Physiology
Programmer Analyst
Project Manager
Psychologist
Purchasing Agent
Quality Control Chemist
Registered Nurse
Reporting Services Specialist
Research
Safety Supervisor
Sales Director
Salesperson
School Administrator
School Superintendent
Senior Software Engineer
Service Center Clerk
Software Consultant
Software Engineer
Software Quality Assurance Supervisor
Special Ed. Paraprofessional
Statistician
Structured Finance Quantitative Analyst
Systems Administrator
Systems Analyst
Teacher, College Math
Teacher, High School Math
Teacher, High School Science
Teacher, Language and Technology
Technical Support Engineer
Technical Trainer
Underwriter
University Math Instructor
Veterinarian
Vice President Commercial Bank
Vice President, Info. Systems
Vice President, Sales
VISTA Volunteer

 
 

There are many occupations that do not require a specific undergraduate major; they are often learned as a result of one-the-job training rather than prior education. What is sought among prospective employees is the development of certain sills and abilities that can be developed not only through an academic major but through courses taken as part of one’s general education, and through internships, directed studies, tutorials, seminars, study abroad, work-study and summer employment, and volunteer experiences.

UMM Big Picture of Math Careers
Mathematics (Adobe Acrobat Supplement)
Graduate/Professional Schools in Mathematics
FSU Match Major Sheets
Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.