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UMM Home > Career Services > Internships > What is an Internship?

What is an Internship?

An internship is an educational experience in an environment providingfield application of a student's theoretical classroom learningInternships are arranged for students who wish to undertake a studyinvolving both academic and applied experience and agrees to receivethe number of credits commensurate with the scope of the project.

Credits
The number of credits for an internship will be determined by the faculty supervisor, subject to approval by the academic dean. Factors that will be considered include the nature of the academic requirements (i.e. books, journals, papers, library research, etc.) and the number of hours per week the student will spend working under the supervision of the field supervisor. Grading is on an S/N basis.

Evaluation
Evaluation of the internship by the faculty supervisor will be made using the same standards that apply to regular course work. Ordinarily, the outcome of the internship will be presented in some tangible form (i.e. papers, reports, etc.) to facilitate this evaluation. The field supervisor will provide a short evaluative report of the student's activities.

Internship Opportunities
UMM has established internships in a variety of areas including, but not limited to:

Historical Research
Business
Counseling
Public Relations
Television and Radio
Public Administration
Computer Programming
Education
Health
Science
Social/Human Services including social work
Government
Political Action
Theatre
Journalism

Field placements have been established with organized internship and cooperative education programs in the above settings.

 
 
PART-TIME/INTERIM JOBS TO CONSIDER

Part-time or interim jobs can help you survive while you are seeking full time employment. These jobs stop-gaps in that you have no intention of remaining in them for an extended period of time.  
 
SEEKING FULL TIME EMPLOYMENT

You should look for part-time or interim jobs that (1) pay you a large enough income on a regular basis to allow you to survive; (2) allows you immediate entry and exit from it; (3) is moderate in its demands on your working time so that you can continue to explore a permanent career area; (4) afford you continual contact with a wide variety of people so that you can make contacts during your work time that might be helpful in your career exploration.

Examples of part-time/interim jobs include:

Census taker
Comparison shopper
Opinion poll interviewer
Receptionist
Retail store clerk
Employment agency interviewer
Cab/bus/train driver
Photographer's helper
Marketing research interviewer
Travel agent
Bartender
Advertising space salesperson
Waitress/waiter
Mail carrier
Museum guard
Handyman
Security guard
Temporary office worker
Golf caddie
Painter
Short order clerk
Domestic house cleaner